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Master's degree

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

MDRR
03 October 2023

UC's Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience (MDRR) is a professional degree that provides an introduction to this rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field. Learn more about studying an MDRR through our Te Kaupeka Pūtaiao | Faculty of Science.

DURATION

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Degree Structure - Duration
1 year full-time

START

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Degree Structure - Start In
Semester 1 (February)

POINTS

180

TUITION FEES

2024 tuition fees estimate per 180 points:

  • Domestic — $13,473
  • International — $59,250

Overview


Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Introduction

The United Nations defines a disaster as a disruption of social and community function, involving so many losses and destructive impacts that affected communities and regions are unable to cope using their own resources. Global efforts to reduce the impacts of disasters over the last decade have failed to keep up with growing exposure of people and assets to natural and other hazards, which is generating new risks and a steady rise in disaster-related losses. To reverse this trend, UN member nations ratified the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in 2015.

The Sendai Framework calls for a broader, more people-centred, preventative approach to disaster risk reduction, in which communities, government and private sectors, civil society organisations, academia, and research institutions work together to build resilience and develop collaborative disaster risk reduction practices.

This Professional Master’s degree provides an introduction to this rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field.



Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Why Study - Body

Why study a Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience at UC?

The Waitaha Canterbury Laboratory

Aotearoa New Zealand is located on the Pacific ‘rim of fire,’ and has one of the most dynamic environments in the world. Floods, earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and tsunami threaten a rapidly-growing, high income economy, driving collaboration between policy, practice research, and local communities, and increasing demand for disaster risk reduction. This makes Aotearoa New Zealand an outstanding laboratory for the study of multi-hazard disaster risk and resilience.

Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha | University of Canterbury is situated in the centre of New Zealand’s South Island, Te Tai Poutini, where the 2010-2011 Canterbury Earthquakes and the 2016 Kaikōura-Hurunui Earthquakes have had extensive and complex impacts in the central and north-east of the island. This has created considerable scope for highly integrated, cutting-edge disaster risk and resilience research.

The Professional Master's programme is taught by a multi-disciplinary team drawn from the Disaster Risk and Resilience Group in UC's Te Kura Aronukurangi | School of Earth and Environment and from Te Pū Ao | GNS Science. This partnership increases the breadth of teaching expertise, student research projects, and industry practice connections.

The programme has won awards for its innovative content and delivery modes, including from the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM).

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Entry Requirements - Body

Entry requirements

To apply for the Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience (MDRR), you will need to have:

  • a bachelor's degree which is relevant to Disaster Risk and Resilience, normally with a B Grade Point Average or higher in the final year; and
  • 15 points from STAT 100-level courses, or equivalent.
    Note: This prerequisite may be waived at the discretion of the Programme Coordinator.

If English is your additional language, you are also required to meet UC's English language requirements.

For the full entry requirements, see the Regulations for the Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience or use the admission requirements checker.

How to apply

It is recommended you apply at least a month before the start of the programme in February or July to complete the enrolment process. For more information please contact Te Kura Aronukurangi | School of Earth and Environment.

You can apply online at myUC.

See Admission and enrolment for all information on enrolling at UC.

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Subjects and Courses - Body

Subjects and courses

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience (MDRR) courses draw disaster risk and resilience content from social, physical, and geospatial sciences, as well as planning, law, and engineering disciplines. Innovative teaching methods include role play disaster simulation exercises, field trips to major infrastructure assets/systems and disaster hotspots, and leading guest lecturers from science, government, and industry.

MDRR students gain an understanding of:

  • current disaster risk and resilience research and practice fields
  • disaster risk drivers, risk communication, and disaster risk reduction strategies
  • disaster resilience-building theory and practices.

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Further Study - Body

Further study

The MDRR is part of a suite of postgraduate qualifications at UC at the intersection of cutting-edge physical and social sciences, exploring interactions between geophysical and human environments with a focus on resilience and geophysical/social environmental dynamics – a growing area of expertise at UC.

See also the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Disaster Risk and Resilience, led by Te Kura Aronukurangi | School of Earth and Environment.

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Career - Body

Career opportunities

MDRR graduates are in a position to choose between proceeding into funded doctoral programmes, or pursuing careers in disaster reduction, risk assessment, hazard assessment, and environmental management and consulting, as well as in local and regional government.

Graduates have found work in consultancies locally and internationally, in NZ Crown Research Institutes, in the National Emergency Management Agency, Toka Tū Ake EQC,in regional Civil Defence and Emergency management Groups, and in the private sector.

Useful information:

2024 tuition fees estimate (per 180 points):

  • Domestic — $13,473
  • International — $59,250

2023 tuition fees estimate (per 180 points):

  • Domestic — $13,362
  • International — $57,000

SSL estimate (per 180 points):

  • 2024 — $1375.50 (capped at 150 points per academic year)
  • 2023 — $1240.50 (capped at 150 points per academic year)

Please note this qualification is not funded by StudyLink.

Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience

Degree Structure - Body

How do I plan my degree?

The 180-point programme is made up of:

  • four compulsory courses (DRRE401, 402, 403, and GISC422) (60 points)
  • an elective course (15 or more points – selected from 400-level courses in which you can explore your specific interests)
  • plus a 60-point dissertation (DRRE691) or a third semester of coursework (60 points).

You may be enrolled for the Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience either on a full-time or part-time basis. It normally takes 1 year to complete (part-time up to 3 years), starting in February.

For full requirements, see the Regulations for the Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience.

Brochures

Postgraduate Prospectus 2024

Whakatairanga Tāura

Download (application/pdf, 3 MB)
Download



Please note:

This qualification is not funded by StudyLink.

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