Nick Draper

ProfessorNick Draper

Physiology Lab G140 Kirkwood
Internal Phone: 93878
Professor Nick Draper is a practitioner-researcher with a focus on finding solutions to real-world problems in sports performance and health contexts.

Qualifications

Research Interests

Professor Nick Draper has been a researcher and teacher at the University of Canterbury for over decade, but has a wealth of experience developed as a practitioner. Nick’s research has a translational focus with the aim of finding solutions to real-world problems. Nick has a thorough understanding of the elite performance sport environment, having been a sport and exercise scientist for British Judo for 8 years and a Selector and Team Manager at European Championships, World Championships and Olympic Games. He has written training programmes for World and Olympic medalists, supporting athletes to success at the highest levels in sport. At a grassroots level Nick continues to coach junior rugby and judo players and has also coached 1st XV and Reps rugby in NZ. Nick started his career as a physical education teacher, graduating from the University of Exeter, and teaching at primary, middle and high school levels.

Nick completed his research training at the Universities of London and New Mexico where he received a thorough grounding in qualitative and quantitative methods, both of which he applies to research problems in his chosen field of exercise physiology. Through his research training and depth of his experience as a practitioner Nick is able to bring a practitioner’s and researcher’s knowledge to solving real-world problems. As a researcher Nick has led or been involved in over 20 successful competitive grants in New Zealand and the UK totaling over $10 million. His current research projects, very much with a translational focus, include examining possible impact force mitigation through rugby headgear, the feasibility of exercise to improve outcomes for cancer patients, the health benefits of trampolining and performance prediction for elite cyclists.

Recent Publications

  • Allan J., Buss LA., Draper N. and Currie MJ. (2022) Exercise in People With Cancer: A Spotlight on Energy Regulation and Cachexia. Frontiers in Physiology 13 http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2022.836804.
  • Faulkner J., O’brien WJ., Stuart B., Stoner L., Batten J., Wadsworth D., Askew CD., Badenhorst CE., Byrd E. and Draper N. (2022) Physical Activity, Mental Health and Wellbeing of Adults within and during the Easing of COVID‐19 Restrictions, in the United Kingdom and New Zealand. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19(3) http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031792.
  • Gajdošík J., Baláš J., Krupková D., Psohlavec L. and Draper N. (2022) Effect of Climbing Speed on Pulmonary Oxygen Uptake and Muscle Oxygen Saturation Dynamics in the Finger Flexors. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance 17(2): 176-184. http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2021-0110.
  • Reeves N., Draper N., Lane KN., Neric F., Tolfrey K. and Davison K. (2022) Introducing the International Confederation of Sport and Exercise Science Practice (ICSESP). British Journal of Sports Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2022-106014.
  • Sellathurai J. and Draper N. (2022) An insight into Short-sprint coaches’ knowledge and use of periodisation models and training methods-Sri Lankan context. Pedagogy of Physical Culture and Sports 26(1): 38-46. http://dx.doi.org/10.15561/26649837.2022.0105.