Paul Russel staff portrait

Paul Russell

Psychology 402
Phone: +643366170
Internal Phone: 6170

Qualifications

Research Interests

I have a particular interest in attention capture; how events that are not currently controlling behaviour can usurp control even when that may be counterproductive, and the converse where seemingly conspicuous events appear to be completely ignored even when it may be costly to ignore them. Related are vigilance situations where people are required to monitor their environment for critical target events over prolonged periods. It is well established that probability of detection of critical events declines the longer one performs the task (vigilance decrement). We are currently exploring factors that enhance or ameliorate this decrement, and seek to apply insights from research on attention capture and executive control to the domain of sustained attention and vigilance decrement.

Recent Publications

  • Blakely MJ., Smith SL., Russell PN. and Helton WS. (2021) The impact of cognitive load on climbing and climbing on cognitive performance. Applied Ergonomics 94 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2021.103413.
  • Epling SL., Edgar GK., Russell PN. and Helton WS. (2019) Is Semantic Vigilance Impaired by Narrative Memory Demands? Theory and Applications. Human Factors 61(3): 451-461. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0018720818805602.
  • McLennan KS., Neumann E. and Russell PN. (2019) Positive and negative priming differences between short-term and long-term identity coding of word-specific attentional priorities. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 81(5): 1426-1441. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13414-018-01661-9.
  • Epling SL., Blakely MJ., Edgar GK., Russell PN. and Helton WS. (2018) Memory impairment during a climbing traverse: implications for search and rescue climbing. Experimental Brain Research 236(11): 3043-3052. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5362-8.
  • Wilson KM., de Joux NR., Finkbeiner KM., Russell PN., Retzler JR. and Helton WS. (2018) Prolonging the response movement inhibits the feed-forward motor program in the sustained attention to response task. Acta Psychologica 183: 75-84. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2018.01.001.