University of Canterbury researchers join public health talks

27 October 2021

Does where you live affect how much you weigh?, and what can parents do to help teach their children about sex and relationships in the digital age?

  • Manawa talks

A free evening of talks on living and ageing well will see nine local health researchers, including three from the University of Canterbury, share their research and knowledge on these and other topics.

We’re Talking Health  will be held on Thursday 4 November as an online only event.

The University of Canterbury speakers are Tracy Clelland, Lecturer in Health Education, School of Health Sciences, Dr Matthew Hobbs, Senior Lecturer in Public Health, and Professor Katharina Naswall, School of Psychology, Speech and Hearing.

Tracy Clelland will discuss Love, Sex and Porn: Parenting and Sexuality Education in the Digital Age, providing guidance for parents in how to support young people to navigate relationships in a changing world.

Dr Hobbs, in a talk called Obe-city: Does where you live affect the weight you gain?, will explain how changes in our food environment, such as increases in the availability of fast-food, can influence weight gain.

Professor Naswall is covering whether the time we spend at work could be good for our health and wellbeing. Her goal is to improve health and wellbeing by making workplaces a positive part of people’s lives.

The other speakers are from Ara Institute of Canterbury, the Canterbury District Health Board and the University of Otago. They will cover topics such as the importance of iron, treatment of infections in children, perimenopause, Parkinson’s disease, and water births.

The free public information evening is hosted by Te Papa Hauora Health Precinct, the Health Research Society of Canterbury and the Canterbury Medical Research Foundation. 

  • The event will be live-streamed and talks start at 5.30pm. Click to join the event here 

For further information please contact:

UC Communications team, media@canterbury.ac.nz, Ph: (03) 369 3631 or 027 503 0168