Te Taiwhenua o te Hauora | GeoHealth Laboratory

GeoHealth Laboratory

Te Taiwhenua o te Hauora | GeoHealth Laboratory undertakes applied research in the areas of health geography, spatial epidemiology and Geographical Information Systems. In particular, work in the GeoHealth Laboratory focuses upon how the local and national contexts shape health outcomes and health inequalities.

Who we are

The Minister of Health, Hon Annette King, launched The GeoHealth Laboratory. This happened at a conference in Wellington in November 2004. The GeoHealth Laboratory is a joint venture between the University of Canterbury and the Ministry of Health. The aim of the collaboration is to build a strategic partnership between the parties around health geography, spatial epidemiology and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Further, we aim to increase research capacity and research outputs in the health and GIS academic sectors. The collaboration provides a resource that is unique in the Southern hemisphere.

What we do

The GeoHealth Laboratory undertakes applied research in the areas of health geography, spatial epidemiology and GIS. In particular, work in the GeoHealth Laboratory focuses upon how the local and national contexts shape health outcomes and health inequalities. Research has focused on how both micro and macro level process help to shape the health of New Zealanders. Our current work has considered how various characteristics of local neighbourhoods influence health outcomes and health-related behaviours. These projects include the effect of community resource access (such as access to parks, food stores and healthcare provision) on health inequalities; the role of deprivation and rurality in influencing suicide rates; environmental justice and air pollution; and the importance of income inequality and macro-level process on inequalities in life expectancy (visit our Publications page for more details). 

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Get connected

There are a number of staff employed by and associated with the collaboration, who work on a range of research projects that are concerned with the social and environmental determinants of health and healthcare. In addition, the GeoHealth Lab provides resources for postgraduate students to work in the GeoHealth Laboratory. Each year a number of postgraduate scholarships are available to suitably qualified students (see "Courses and Study" website or contact Prof. Simon Kingham (simon.kingham@canterbury.ac.nz).

  • GHL team 2018

    GHL Team 2018

    GeoHealth Laboratory Team in 2018

Master of Spatial Analysis for Public Health 

The new Master of Spatial Analysis for Public Health (MSAPH) combines expertise on public health issues with GIS technologies. Spatial health data is fundamental to assess hazards from environmental exposure and the impact of health intervention towards the well-being of communities.

Geospatial analysts can use spatial data to determine important health demographics such as disease causation and spread prevention, disaster risk factors, genetic disease likelihood, physical and mental behavioural trends, and economic effect. These issues are on the rise and experts are needed globally. For more information visit the website.

Interested students are encouraged to contact: Dr Malcolm Campbell (Program Director) malcolm.campbell@canterbury.ac.nz

Recommended Courses

Postgraduate 400 level courses in Geographic Information Science, The Professtional Master of Geospatial Science and Technology. One course of particular relevance is GISC411: Spatial Analytics for Health.

Honours courses in Health, Well-Being and Environment (Geog325) and Well-Being, Community and Place (GEOG401).

 

*** For PhD and Masters scholarship information visit our "Scholarships and Internships" website ***

 

GeoHealth Lab Staff

Simon Kingham

Professor
Human Geography,Chief Science Advisor, MoT
Beatrice Tinsley Rm 308
Internal Phone: 94064

Malcolm Campbell

Associate Professor
Human Geography
Beatrice Tinsley Rm 309
Internal Phone: 94181

Jesse Wiki

Research Manager, Postdoctoral Fellow
Internal Phone: 90911

Lukas Marek

Post Doctoral Fellow
Ernest Rutherford 261
Internal Phone: 94344

Matt Hobbs

Senior Research Fellow (adjunct)
Manawa 405G
Internal Phone: 90198

 

Visitors to The GeoHealth Laboratory

The Department of Geography, UC, has hosted a number of visiting Erskine Fellows and others with research interests in health geography, who have collaborated with staff of the GeoHealth Laboratory in research projects. See publications.

  • Prof. Philippe Apparicio (INRS, Montreal, Canada)
  • Prof. Graham Moon (University of Portsmouth, UK)
  • Prof. Danny Dorling (University of Sheffield, UK)
  • Prof. Graham Bentham (University of East Anglia, UK)
  • Prof. Robin Flowerdew (University of St Andrews, UK)
  • Prof. Robin Haynes (University of East Anglia, UK)
  • Prof. Michael Emch (University of North Caroline, USA)
  • Dr Richard Mitchel (University of Edinburgh, UK)

 

Former Postgraduate Students

Over the years, we had a number of postgraduate students working in the GeoHealth Laboratory:

  • Kurt Janssen (PHI intern) - MoH, MfE, ESRI (California), Interpret (ChCh)
  • Katherine Tisch (Masters) – ESR, GeoHealth Lab, Edinburgh Uni
  • Erin Holmes (Masters) - MoH (Wellington)
  • Kate McPherson (Masters) - CCC (Christchurch)
  • Laura Miller (PhD) - (AAG ‘best thesis’ winner 2008), Researcher (Perth, Aus)
  • Jeff Wilson (PhD) – Harvard Uni (postdoc), Dean, Huston-Tillotson Uni, US
  • Chris Bowie (Masters) – Researcher, Opus (Wellington)
  • Sam Valentine (Masters) - Project Manager, Appian Group (Sydney)
  • Matt Willoughby (Masters) - Canterbury District Health Board
  • Kimberley Reed (Masters GIS) – GIS Analyst, Marlborough Lines Ltd
  • Dan Nutsford (Masters GIS) – GIS Analyst, Auckland Council
  • Jayden MacRae (Masters) – CEO, Patients First, Wellington
  • Nick Brunsdon (Masters) – Economic Analyst, CDC, Christchurch
  • Daniel Hogg (PhD) – GIS professional, Germany

 

Research

Staff associated with the GeoHealth Laboratory work on a range of health and health-related research projects with colleagues here in New Zealand and overseas.

Research Projects Work Program 2018/19

Immunisation is a simple, safe and effective way of protecting people against harmful diseases. The rate of childhood immunisation has increased over time and are now declining. Will targeted interventions be effective in raising the immunisation rate and reducing inequities?
 
This project aims to inform the Government’s priority on improving child well-being. We will analyse the group of children that are not immunised with those that are. We are planning to identify changes and trends over time and space. The results should lead to the identification of groups of children and the areas they live in. This will show locations that will benefit from targeted interventions.
Birth rates across New Zealand are not uniform. The provision of midwifery services is not necessarily aligned with birth rates. This can lead to women not having access to appropriate and local care during a pregnancy. Hence this can have an impact on future child well-being.
 
This project will use spatial-temporal analysis to explore maternity health outcomes. Also, in what areas do pregnant woman have difficulty accessing maternity care services? And how do the economic, environmental and social factors differ for those that have difficulty?
 
This project will contribute to the governments’ key priority on improving child well-being and reducing equity. This is done by highlighting the impact of women having timely access to maternity care services.
This project will determine how where you live and your movement frequency affect life for the people of Lakes DHB. We will focus on Primary Health Organisations (PHO) enrolment, service access/community support, and LTC outcomes/quality of life.
 
One of the project’s main focuses is the identification of people with limited or irregular interaction with the health services. Reasons such as low-engagement, non-enrolment or transience can play a part. We will also try to identify possible barriers limiting the access to services.
Better access to primary care might lead to a reduction in potentially avoidable hospitalisations (PAH). From 2007, the Ministry of Health identified reducing ASH among children aged 0–4 years in New Zealand as a priority. ASH conditions include, for example, respiratory infections, dental conditions and asthma.
 
ASH accounts for approximately 30% of all acute and arranged medical and surgical discharges each year. This figure applies to New Zealand children.
 
A better understanding of ASH rates in relation to healthcare facilities may help inform policy. We will break this down by area-level deprivation, urban classification and ethnicity.
 
The project results will be of interest for the Ministry of Health contacts. This includes the general managers, the clinical groups, and the stakeholders. As well as everyone involved in the delivery of services.
In New Zealand, the child obesity rate increased from 8% in 2006/07 to 12% in 2016/17. The lifetime cost of obesity is difficult to estimate. Child obesity places a significant burden on health care systems, families, and employers. Non-communicable diseases, for example, showed to impair an individual’s lifetime educational attainment.
 
It is difficult to see obesity declining when living in built environments that actively encourage weight gain.
 
Some of these upstream factors, for example the design of the built environment, are not in the control of a child. Therefore it cannot be seen as a result of lifestyle choices by a child.
 
Previous studies rarely considered aspects of the environment alongside parental risk factors.
 
This project will investigate the risk of childhood obesity. We are investigating the relationship between the built environment and the parental characteristics. The analysis uses pooled New Zealand Health Survey data.

This project will assist the Protection Regulation and Assurance business unit. We aim to provide statistical information for the physical activity guidelines and justification. This can provide advice on the importance of physical activity to other agencies and Ministers.

Some of the current key research projects include:

The increased risk of infectious disease transmission due to overcrowding in the home is an area that is receiving increased attention. This research examined the effect of neighbourhood level household crowding on hospital admissions for Otitis media (glue ear) among children in NZ.

Results indicated that children living in neighbourhoods with a high level of crowding were more at risk of admission to hospital for Otitis media than those living in relatively un-crowded areas after controlling for known individual and environmental risk factors. This research adds weight to the debate surrounding social housing policy and the population health benefits that can be derived from provision of adequate and affordable housing for vulnerable groups in NZ.

The positive effects of access and exposure to greenspace in the urban environment have included increased activity levels, reduced stress and increased mental wellbeing. Emerging research is examining the effect of living close to or being exposed to bluespace such as rivers, lakes and the coast. Does living near these areas increase the well-being of residents or are less deprived and therefore potentially more healthy individuals more likely to be able to afford to live in these desirable places?

The Christchurch earthquakes were an event which impacted on the entire population of the City and wider region; however the effects were not uniform. Individuals had vastly different experiences at the time of the devastating Christchurch earthquakes, especially on the 22nd of February 2011, while different individuals, families, neighbourhoods and communities were faced with much different patterns of destruction and ongoing trauma in their lives.

Current research aims to examine the relationship between the mental well-being and exposure to earthquake-related impacts in post-earthquakes Christchurch. Particular emphasis is placed on exploring whether the city has been negatively impacted as a whole or if different groups are suffering more greatly due to their exposure and damage to their home environment and community.

A recent trend in the literature has been on investigating the effects of the built environment on active travel behaviour and related health outcomes.  Research to date has focused mainly on walkability and to a lesser extent bikeability of the built environment.  However, other modes of transport commonly used in daily life such as public transport and car use have received less attention.

One of the main aims of this research is to build on previous research and create GIS based indices of walkability, bikeability, public transport-ability and drive-ability for neighbourhoods in two cities in New Zealand: Auckland and Wellington.  A second aim is to assess how these indices relate to active transport behaviours and health outcomes.

These indices may be used by city planners and policy makers alike in deciding where to situate neighbourhood and community resources as well as identify areas that can be developed to promote more active forms of transport. It is also important for health research to inform why residents of some neighbourhoods actively engage in physical activity in their local environment while others do not.

Publications

 

This page hosts a collection of data and associated reports compiled as part of the GeoHealth Laboratory work programme

If you re-use, publish, distribute or otherwise disseminate this data the relevant attribution should be used

Accounting for multiple environmental influences, such as the clustering of environmental exposures which are either health-promoting ‘goods’ such as green spaces, or health-constraining ‘bads’ such as alcohol outlets may represent a more accurate reflection of how environments influence behaviour and health. Nationwide data were collected, processed, and geocoded on a comprehensive range of environmental exposures.

Health-constraining ‘bads’ are represented by fast-food outlets, takeaway outlets, dairy outlets and convenience stores, alcohol outlets, and gaming venues. Health-promoting ‘goods’ are represented by green spaces, blue spaces, physical activity facilities, fruit and vegetable outlets, and supermarkets.

This data represents measures of accessibility of environmental ‘goods’ and ‘bads’ in New Zealand by meshblock (2018).

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Marek, L., Hobbs, M., Wiki, J., Kingham, S., & Campbell, M. (2021). The good, the bad, and the environment: Developing an area-based measure of access to health-promoting and health-constraining environments in New Zealand. International Journal of Health Geographics, 20(1), 16-16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12942-021-00269-x

Alcohol outlet data in New Zealand were obtained, cleaned and geocoded. Alcohol outlets were sourced from the Alcohol Regulatory & Licensing Authority (ARLA) for the period 2015-2018 from the current and active licence register. All alcohol outlets (n=19,035) were extracted from the database based on the proprietary classifications provided by ARLA. The sale of alcohol to the public in New Zealand requires the seller to have a licence and can be obtained from: https://www.justice.govt.nz/tribunals/arla/register-of-licences-and-certificates/.

Data were removed if duplicates (n=3,657) or if conveyance services (n=203) such as airlines who were often registered at the airport rather than actual location of sale. Highways were then checked manually (n=165) as address records often stated the business name and State Highway 1 for instance. Subsequently, 14 records were removed as addresses could not be identified. This resulted in a final sample of 13,989 alcohol outlets to geocode within ArcGIS 10.7.1. Within the output, 13,694 were matched and 295 were tied results. We then tested a random 100 records to investigate if they were geocoded to the correct CAU and 92% were found to be correct. Within this, 2,148 were club licences, 3,423 were off-licence, 8,077 were on-licence and 341 were special licence.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Deng, B.Y., Wiki J., Hobbs, M., Marek, L., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2020). GeoHealth laboratory dataset: cleaned nationwide alcohol outlets 2015–2018. (Version 1) [Data set]. Available from: https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/science/research/geohealth/publications-reports-and-data/

 

Data on the location of gaming venues (n=1081) were obtained from the 2018 Department of Internal Affairs register and were extracted based on proprietary classification in the register for all licenced gaming venues. Constructs were defined as consistent with the Department of Internal Affairs register and included licensed venues operating gaming machines.

Data were geocoded using Google Maps Geocoding API through Rstudio using the ggmap package with one record not being able to geocode. As in with previous data, we have tested 100 randomly selected record in order to estimate geocoding accuracy (98%).

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Marek, L., Hobbs, M., Wiki, J., Kingham, S., & Campbell, M. (2021). The good, the bad, and the environment: Developing an area-based measure of access to health-promoting and health-constraining environments in New Zealand. International Journal of Health Geographics, 20(1), 16-16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12942-021-00269-x

Data on the location of pharmacies nationwide (2017).

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Wiki J., Hobbs, M., Marek, L., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2020). GeoHealth laboratory dataset: cleaned nationwide pharmacies. (Version 1) [Data set]. Available from: https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/science/research/geohealth/publications-reports-and-data/

Data on the location of hospitals nationwide (2017).

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Marek, L., Wiki J., Hobbs, M., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2020). GeoHealth laboratory dataset: cleaned nationwide hospital locations. (Version 1) [Data set]. Available from: https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/science/research/geohealth/publications-reports-and-data/

Data on the location of General Practitioners (GPs) nationwide.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Hobbs, M., Wiki, J., Marek, L., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2020). GeoHealth laboratory dataset: cleaned nationwide general practitioner locations. (Version 1) [Data set]. Available from: https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/science/research/geohealth/publications-reports-and-data/

Data on the location of community oral health services nationwide.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Hobbs, M., Wiki, J., Marek, L., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2020). GeoHealth laboratory dataset: cleaned nationwide community oral health service locations. (Version 1) [Data set]. Available from: https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/science/research/geohealth/publications-reports-and-data/

Data on the location of food outlets are from two sources, Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and Territorial Authorities (TAs). Data on business registrations from MPIs public register was collected in 2017. Data on health licences from 2013–2015 were requested from 66 TAs, excluding Chatham Islands due to their remote nature, and pre-defined categories of business were given by 89.6%. If not given, the business name was used for categorisation, with ambiguous names investigated or excluded if a category could not be defined.

Data was geocoded using Google Maps Application Programming Interface (API), and the geographic coordinates for any un-matched records were manually looked up. Data may be incomplete in rural areas.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Wiki, J., Kingham, S., & Campbell, M. (2019). Accessibility to food retailers and socioeconomic deprivation in urban New Zealand. New Zealand Geographer, 75(1), 3-11. doi:10.1111/nzg.12201

Nationwide population vulnerability data based on demographic variables, socioeconomic deprivation, long-term health conditions, health behaviours, linguistic barriers and health service awareness at Statistical Area 2 (SA2) level.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand License

Citation: Wiki, J., Marek, L., Hobbs, M., Kingham, S., & Campbell, M. (2021). Understanding vulnerability to COVID-19 in New Zealand: A nationwide cross-sectional study. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand. doi:10.1080/03036758.2021.1900294

Key publications

The staff associated with the GeoHealth Laboratory have published widely in national and international Geography and Public Health journals. Visit the UC Research Repository (https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/handle/10092/16868) to access publications and theses.

 A selection of recent key publications are listed below:

  • Wiki, J., Marek, L., Hobbs, M., Kingham, S., & Campbell, M. (2021). Understanding vulnerability to COVID-19 in New Zealand: A nationwide cross-sectional study. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand. https://doi:10.1080/03036758.2021.1900294   
  • Campbell, M., Marek, L., Wiki, J., Hobbs, M., Sabel, C., McCarthy, J., & Kingham, S. (2021). National movement patterns during the COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand: the unexplored role of neighbourhood deprivation. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. Published Online First 16 March 2021. https://doi:10.1136/jech-2020-216108
  • Hobbs, M., Kingham, S., Wiki, J., Marek, L., & Campbell, M. (2021). Unhealthy environments are associated with adverse mental health and psychological distress: Cross-sectional evidence from nationally representative data in New Zealand. Preventive Medicine, 145. Https://doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2020.106416
  • Hobbs, M., Schoeppe, S., Duncan, M. J., Vandelanotte, C., Marek, L., Wiki, J. . . . Kingham, S. (2021). Objectively measured waist circumference is most strongly associated in father–boy and mother–girl dyads in a large nationally representative sample of New Zealanders. International Journal of Obesity, 45(2), 438-448. https://doi:10.1038/s41366-020-00699-w
  • Hobbs, M., Mackenbach, J. D., Wiki, J., Marek, L., McLeod, G. F. H., & Boden, J. M. (2021). Investigating change in the food environment over 10 years in urban New Zealand: A longitudinal and nationwide geospatial study. Social Science and Medicine, 269. https://doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113522
  • Marek, L., Greenwell, J., Hobbs, M., McCarthy, J., Wiki, J., Campbell, M., Kingham, S., & Tomintz, M. (2021). Combining large linked social service microdata and geospatial data to identify vulnerable populations in New Zealand. In M. Birkin, G. Clarke, J. Corcoran, & R. Stimson (Eds.), Big Data Applications in Geography and Planning – An Essential Companion (pp. 52–63). Edward Elgar Publishing
  • Oldroyd, R.A., Hobbs, M., Campbell, M., Jenneson, V., Morris, M.A., Pontin, F., Sturley, C., Tomintz, M., Marek, L., Wiki, J., Birkin, M., & Kingham, S. (2021). Progress towards using linked population-based data for geohealth research: Comparisons of Aotearoa New Zealand and the United Kingdom. Applied Spatial Analysis. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12061-021-09381-8
  • Marek, L., Hobbs, M., Wiki, J., Kingham, S., & Campbell, M. (2021). The good, the bad, and the environment: Developing an area-based measure of access to health-promoting and health-constraining environments in New Zealand. International Journal of Health Geographics, 20(1), 16- 16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12942-021-00269-x
  • Hobbs, M., Biddle, S. J. H., Kingsnorth, A. P., Marek, L., Tomintz, M., Wiki, J., McCarthy, J., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2021). Investigating the association between child television viewing and measured child adiposity outcomes in a large nationally representative sample of New Zealanders: A cross-sectional study. Journal of Physical Activity & Health, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2020-0192
  • Campbell, M., Wiki, J., Marek, L., Hobbs, M., Wilson, M., & Kingham, S. (2021). The Value of a Policy-Responsive Research Funding Model: The Geohealth Laboratory Collaboration in New Zealand. In A. Rajabifard, G. Foliente, D. Paez (Eds.), COVID-19 Pandemic, Geospatial Information, and Community Resilience: Global Applications and Lessons (pp. 469–473). Taylor & Francis
  • Campbell, M., Marek, L., & Hobbs, M. (2021). Reconsidering movement and exposure: Towards a more dynamic health geography. Geography Compass. https://doi.org/10.1111/gec3.12566

 

 

  • Hobbs, M., Marek, L., Clarke, R., McCarthy, J., Tomintz, M., Wade, A., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2020). Investigating the prevalence of non-fluoride toothpaste use in adults and children using nationally representative data from New Zealand: a cross-sectional study. British Dental Journal, 228 (4), pp.269-276. https://doi:10.1038/s41415-020-1304-5   
  • Hobbs, M., Wade, A., Jones, P., Marek, L., Tomintz, M., Sharma, K., McCarthy, J., Mattingley, B., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2020). ‘Area-level deprivation, childhood dental ambulatory sensitive hospitalizations and community water fluoridation: evidence from New Zealand’, International Journal of Epidemiology, dyaa043, https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyaa043
  • Marek, L., Hobbs, M., McCarthy, J., Wiki, J., Tomintz, M., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2020). Investigating spatial variation and change (2006–2017) in childhood immunisation coverage in New Zealand. Social Science & Medicine, 113292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113292
  • Marek, L., Wiki, J., Campbell, M., Kingham, S., Sabel, C., Tomintz, M., & Hobbs, M. (2020). Slipping under the radar: worsened health outcomes in semi-urban areas of New Zealand. The New Zealand Medical Journal (Online), 133(1519), 121-125
  • Wiki, J., Kingham, S., & Campbell, M. (2020). A geospatial analysis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the food environment in urban New Zealand. Social Science & Medicine, 113231. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113231
  • Marek L., Hobbs M., McCarthy J., Wiki J., Tomintz M., Campbell M., & Kingham S. (2020). Investigating spatial variation and change (2006 – 2017) in childhood immunization coverage in New Zealand. Social Science and Medicine 264:113292 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113292
  • Marek L., Hobbs M., Wiki J., McCarthy J., Tomintz M., Campbell M., & Kingham S. (2020). Spatial-temporal patterns of childhood immunisation in New Zealand (2006–2017): an improving pattern but not for all? European Journal of Public Health http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa225
  • Hobbs M., Marek L., Wiki J., Campbell M., Deng B., Sharpe H., McCarthy J., & Kingham S. (2020). Close Proximity to alcohol outlets is associated with increased crime and hazardous drinking: Pooled nationally representative data from New Zealand. Health and Place 65: 102397. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2020.102397
  • Hobbs M., Schoeppe S., Duncan M.J. et al. (2020). Objectively measured waist circumference is most strongly associated in father–boy and mother–girl dyads in a large nationally representative sample of New Zealanders. Int J Obes. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41366-020-00699-w

 

  • Hobbs, M., Tomintz, M., McCarthy, J., Marek, L., Vannier, C., Campbell, M., & Kingham, S. (2019). Obesity risk in women of childbearing age in New Zealand: A nationally representative cross-sectional study. International Journal of Public Health, 64(4), 625-635. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-019-01239-8
  • Hobbs, M., Ahuriri-Driscoll, A., Marek, L., Campbell, M., Tomintz, M., & Kingham, S. (2019). Reducing health inequity for Māori people in New Zealand. The Lancet (British Edition), 394(10209), 1613-1614. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30044-3
  • Apparicio P., Gelb J., Carrier M., Mathieu MÈ. and Kingham S. (2018) Exposure to noise and air pollution by mode of transportation during rush hours in Montreal. Journal of Transport Geography 70: 182-192. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2018.06.007.
  • Hobbs M., Duncan M., Collins P., Mckenna J., Schoeppe S., Rebar AL., Short C. and Vandelanotte C. (2018) Clusters of health behaviours in Queensland adults are associated with different socio-demographic characteristics. Journal of Public Health early access online http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdy043.
  • Hobbs M., Griffiths C., Green MA., Christensen A. and McKenna J. (2018) Examining longitudinal associations between the recreational physical activity environment, change in body mass index, and obesity by age in 8864 Yorkshire Health Study participants. Social Science and Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.06.027.
  • Hobbs M., Griffiths C., Green MA., Jordan H., Saunders J. and McKenna J. (2018) Associations between the combined physical activity environment, socioeconomic status, and obesity: a cross-sectional study. Perspectives in Public Health 138(3): 169-172. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1757913917748353.
  • Hobbs M., Griffiths C., Green MA., Jordan H., Saunders J. and McKenna J. (2018) Neighbourhood typologies and associations with body mass index and obesity: A cross-sectional study. Preventive Medicine 111: 351-357. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.11.024.
  • Marek, L., Campbell, M., Epton, M., Kingham, S., and Storer, M. (2018). Winter Is Coming: A Socio-Environmental Monitoring and Spatiotemporal Modelling Approach for Better Understanding a Respiratory Disease. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Information 7: 432. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijgi7110432
  • Tomintz, M N and Barnett, R. (2018) Geosimulation approach for filling the gap of non-response smoking data from the census 2013: A spatial analysis of census area unit geographies. New Zealand Geographer, 152-159, https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/nzg.12199.
  • Wiki J., Kingham S. and Campbell, M. (2018) Accessibility to food retailers and socio‐economic deprivation in urban New Zealand. New Zealand Geographer https://doi.org/10.1111/nzg.12201
  • Marek, L., Campbell, M. and Bui, L. (2017) Shaking for innovation: The (re)building of a (smart) city in a post disaster environment. Cities 63: 41-50. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2016.12.013. (Journal articles)
  • Beere P & Kingham S, 2017, Greenspace Exposure and Academic Achievement in Urban New Zealand Primary Schools. New Zealand Geographer. http://doi:10.1111/nzg.12155 11
  • Griffin E, McCarthy J, Thomas F & Kingham S, 2017, New Zealand Healthline call data used to measure the effect of travel time on the use of the emergency department. Social Science & Medicine 179, 91–96.
  • Marek L, Campbell M & Bui L, 2017, Shaking for innovation: The (re)building of a (smart) city in a post disaster environment. Cities 63: 41-50. 2016.12.013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2016.12.013.
  • Pattinson W, Kingham S, Longley I & Salmond J, 2017, Potential pollution exposure reductions from small-distance bicycle lane separations. Journal of Transport & Health 4, 40–52.
  • Tomintz MN, Kosar B & García-Barrios VM, 2017, simSALUD – an open source spatial microsimulation tool for novices and experts. The International Journal of Microsimulation, 10, 2, 118-143, http://www.microsimulation.org/IJM/V10_2/IJM_2017_10_2_4.pdf
  • Bowie, C., Campbell, M., Beere, P. and Kingham, S. (2016) Social and spatial inequalities in Rotaviral enteritis: supporting universally funded vaccination in New Zealand. New Zealand Medical Journal 129(1431): 59
  • Campbell, Malcolm. and Ballas, Dimitris. (2016) SimAlba: A Spatial Microsimulation Approach to the Analysis of Health Inequalities. Frontiers in Public Health http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2016.00230. (Journal articles)
  • Apparicio P, Carrier M, Gelb J, Séguin A & Kingham S, 2016, Cyclists’ exposure to air pollution and road traffic noise in central city neighbourhoods of Montreal. Journal of Transport Geography, 57, 63-69. http://doi:10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2016.09.014
  • Hogg D, Kingham S, Wilson T & Ardagh, M, 2016, The effects of spatially varying earthquake impacts on mood and anxiety symptom treatments among long-term Christchurch residents following the 2010/11 Canterbury earthquakes, New Zealand. Health & Place 41, 78-88. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.08.002
  • Hogg D, Kingham S, Wilson T & Ardagh M, 2016, Spatio-temporal variation of mood and anxiety symptom treatments in Christchurch in the context of the 2010/11 Canterbury earthquake sequence. Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology, 19, 91-102. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sste.2016.08.001
  • Hogg D, Kingham S, Wilson T, & Ardagh M, 2016, The effects of relocation and level of affectedness on mood and anxiety symptom treatments after the 2011 Christchurch earthquake. Social Science & Medicine, 152, 18-26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.01.025
  • Nutsford D, Pearson A, Kingham S & Reitsma F, 2016, Residential exposure to visible blue space (but not green space) associated with lower psychological distress in a capital city. Health and Place 39, 70-78.
  • Pattinson W, Langstaff J, Longley I & Kingham S, 2016, Using an ambient air pollution exposure model to explore the impact of local residents' proximity to a major highway. Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, 9, 4, 335–357
  • Sabel C, Hiscock R, Asikainen A, Bi J, Depledge M, van den Elshout S, Friedrich R, Huang G, Hurley F, Jantunen M, Karakitsios S, Keuken M, Kingham S, Kontoroupis P, Kuenzli N, Liu M, Martuzzi M, Morton K, Mudu P, Niittynen M, Perez L, Sarigiannis D, Stahl-Timmins W, Tobollik M, Tuomisto J & Willers S, 2016. Public health impacts of city policies to reduce climate change: findings from the URGENCHE EU-China project. Environmental Health 15 (Supp 1): 25. http://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-016-0097-0.
  • Schluter P, Ahuriri-Driscoll A, Anderson T, Beere P, Brown J, Dalrymple-Alford J, Davidson A, Gillon D, Hirdes J, Keeling S, Kingham S, Lacey C, Menclova A, Millar N, Mor V & Jamieson H, 2016, Comprehensive Clinical Assessment of Home-based Older Persons within New Zealand: an epidemiological profile of a national cross-section. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40, 4, 349–355.
  • Tomintz MN, Kosar B & Clarke GP, 2016, smokeSALUD: exploring the effect of demographic change on the smoking prevalence at municipality level in Austria, International Journal of Health Geographics, 15, 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-016-0066-4
  • Tomintz MN & Garcia-Barrios VM (2016). simSALUD - Towards a Health Decision Support System for Regional Planning, in Lombard J, Clarke GP and Stern E (eds.): Applied spatial modelling and planning, Routledge, London.Tomintz MN, Kosar B & García-Barrios VM, 2016, simSALUD – an open source spatial microsimulation tool for novices and experts. The International Journal of Microsimulation, 10, 2, 118-143, http://www.microsimulation.org/IJM/V10_2/IJM_2017_10_2_4.pdf
  • Zmölnig J, Tomintz MN & Clarke GP, 2016, Mapping the distribution of diabetes for public health support in Austria, GIS.Science, Wichmann, 3, 86-97.
  • Campbell M, Beere P, Bowie C, Griffin E, Kingham S, 2015. Suicides and unemployment: is there a relationship in New Zealand? Australasian Epidemiologist
  • Campbell MH, Bowie C, Kingham S, McCarthy JP, 2015. Painting a picture of trans-Tasman mortality. Public Health 129, 4, 396-402.
  • Nutsford D, Reitsma F, Pearson A and Kingham S, 2015. Personalising the Viewshed: Visibility analysis from the human perspective. Applied Geography 62, 1.
  • Jenkins G, Pearson A, Bentham G, Day P and Kingham S (2015). Neighbourhood influences on children’s weight-related behaviours and BMI. AIMS Public Health 2(3), 501. http://www.aimspress.com/article/10.3934/publichealth.2015.3.501
  • MacRae J, Kingham S and Griffin E (2015). The effect of spatial barriers on realised accessibility to health services after a natural disaster. Health & Place 35, 1–10.
  • Tomintz MN, Clarke GP and Alfadhli N (2015). Location-allocation models. in: Brunsdon, C and Singleton A (eds.): Geocomputation: a Practical Primer, Sage, London.
  • Hogg D, Kingham S, Wilson T, Griffin E and Ardagh M, 2014, Geographic variation of clinically diagnosed mood and anxiety disorders in Christchurch after the 2010/11 earthquakes. Health and Place 30, 270–278.
  • Storer M, Salmond J, Dirks K, Kingham S and Epton M, 2014. Mobile selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) devices and their use for pollution exposure monitoring in breath and ambient air–pilot study. Journal of Breath Research 8, 037106.
  • Pearson AL, Bentham G, Day P and Kingham S, 2014, Associations between neighbourhood environmental characteristics and obesity and related behaviours among adult New Zealanders. BMC Public Health 14, 553.
  • Pattinson W, Longley I and Kingham S, 2014. Proximity to busy highways and local resident perceptions of air quality. Health and Place 31, 154–162.
  • Bowie C, Pearson AL, Campbell M, Barnett R, 2014. Household crowding associated with childhood otitis media hospitalisations in New Zealand. Australia and New Zealand Journal of Public Health. Published online. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12162
  • Campbell M, Apparicio P, Day, P, 2014. Geographic analysis of infant mortality New Zealand, 1995-2008: an ethnicity perspective. Australia and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, in press
  • Pearson AL, Barnard L, Pearce J, Kingham S, Howden-Chapman P, 2014. Housing quality and resilience in New Zealand. Building Research & Information. Vol 42 (2), pp 182-190. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09613218.2014.850603
  • Pearson AL, Winter PR, McBreen B, Stewart G, Roets R, Bowie C, Nutsford D, Donnellan N, Wilson N, 2014. Obtaining fruit and vegetables for the lowest prices: Pricing survey of different outlets and geographical analysis of competition effects. PLOS ONE, Vol 9 (3).http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0089775
  • Tisch C, Pearson AL, Kingham S, Borman B, Briggs D, 2014. Environmental Health Indicators: A review of initiatives worldwide. Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, Vol 25 (4).  
  • Walls KL, Benke GR,  Kingham S, 2014. Potential increased radon exposure due to greater building energy-efficiency for climate change mitigation. Air Quality & Climate Change, Vol  48 (1), pp 16-22. 
  • Bowie C, Beere P, Griffin E, Campbell M, Kingham S, 2013. Variation in health and social equity in the spaces where we live: A review of previous literature from the GeoHealth Laboratory. New Zealand Sociology Journal , Vol 28 (3), pp 164-191.
  • Campbell, M.H. and Ballas, D. (2013) A spatial microsimulation approach to economic policy analysis in Scotland. Regional Science Policy & Practice 5(3): 263-288. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rsp3.12009
  • Campbell M, Ballas D, Dorling D, Mitchell R, 2013. Mortality inequalities: Scotland versus England and Wales. Health and Place, Vol 23, pp 179-186. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2013.06.004
  • Nutsford D, Pearson A, Kingham S, 2013. An ecological study investigating the association between access to urban green space and mental health. Public Health, Vol 127 (11), pp 1005-1011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2013.08.016
  • Kingham S, Longley I, Salmond J, Pattinson W, Shrestha K, 2013. Variations in exposure to traffic pollution while travelling by different modes in a low density, less congested city. Environmental Pollution, Vol 181, pp 211-218. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2013.06.030
  • Kingham S, Pattinson W, Pearson AL, Longley I, Campbell M, Apparicio P, 2013. The use of a land use regression model to predict NO2 air pollution in two small areas of Auckland. Air Quality and Climate Change, Vol  47 (3), pp 40-44. 
  • Longley I, Kingham S, Dirks K, Somervell E, Pattinson W, Elangasinghe A, 2013. Detailed observations and validated modelling of the impact of traffic on the air quality of roadside communities. New Zealand Transport Agency, pp203.
  • Pearson AL, Pearce J, Kingham S, 2013. Deprived yet healthy: Neighbourhood-level resilience in New Zealand. Social Science and Medicine, Vol 91, pp 238-245. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.09.046
  • Pearson AL, Griffin E, Davies A, Kingham S, 2013. An ecological study of the relationship between socioeconomic isolation and mental health in the most deprived areas in Auckland, New Zealand. Health and Place, Vol 19, pp 159-166. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2012.10.012
  • Pearson A, Kingham S, Mitchell P, Apparicio P, 2013. Exploring hotspots of pneumococcal pneumonia and potential impacts of ejecta dust exposure following the Christchurch earthquakes. Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology, Vol 7, pp 1-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sste.2013.08.001
  • Richardson EA, Pearce J, Mitchell R, Kingham S, 2013. Role of physical activity in the relationship between urban green space and health. Public Health, Vol 127 (4), pp 318-324. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2013.01.004
  • Salmond JA, Williams DE, Laing G, Kingham S, Dirks K, Longley I, Henshaw GS, 2013. The influence of vegetation on the horizontal and vertical distribution of pollutants in a street canyon. Science of the Total Environment, Vol 443, pp 287-298. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.10.101
  • Ballas D, Campbell M, Clarke G, Hanaoka K, Nakaya T, Waley P, 2012. A spatial microsimulation approach to small area income estimation in Britain and Japan. Studies in Regional Science, Vol42 (1), pp 163-187. http://dx.doi.org/10.2457/srs.42.163
  • Kingham S, Longley I, Salmond J, Pattinson W, Shrestha K, 2012. Variations in exposure to traffic pollution while travelling by different modes in a low density, less congested city. Environmental Pollution, accepted.
  • Graham F, White P, Kingham S, Harte D, 2012. Changing Epidemiological Trends of Legionellosis in New Zealand, 1979-2009. Epidemiology and Infection, Vol 140 (8), pp 1481-96.
  • Day P, Breetzke G, Kingham S, Campbell M, 2012. Close proximity to alcohol outlets is associated with increased serious violent crime in New Zealand. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Vol 36, pp 48–54. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2012.00827.x
  • Moon G, Pearce J, Barnett JR, 2012. Smoking, ethnic residential segregation and ethnic diversity: a spatio-temporal analysis. Annals Association of American Geographers, Vol 102, pp 1-10.  http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00045608.2012.657497#.UZVk_40gfcQ
  • Pearce J, Barnett JR, Moon G, Pearce, J, 2012. Socio-spatial inequalities in health-related behaviours: pathways linking place and smoking. Progress in Human Geography, Vol 36, pp 3-24.
  • Hiscock R, Moon G, Pearce J, Barnett R, Daley V, 2012. Do General Medical Practice Characteristics Influence the Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Programs? A Multilevel Analysis.  Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol 14, pp 703-710. http://ntr.oxfordjournals.org/content/14/6/703.short
  • Brewer N, Pearce N, Day P, Borman B, 2012. Travel time and distance to health care only partially account for the ethnic inequalities in cervical cancer stage at diagnosis and mortality in New Zealand. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Vol 36 (4), pp 335-342. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2012.00843.x
  • Kingham S, 2011. How important is urban air pollution as a health hazard? (invited editorial). New Zealand Medical Journal, Vol 124, pp 1330, 5-7. http://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/handle/10092/5401
  • Richardson EA, Pearce J, Kingham S, 2011. Is particulate air pollution associated with health and health inequalities in New Zealand? Health & Place, Vol 17 (5), pp 1137-1143.
  • Kingham S, and Dorset W, 2011. Assessment of exposure approaches in air pollution and health research in Australia and New Zealand. Air Quality and Climate Change, Vol 45 (2), pp 28-38.
  • Fukuda K, Hider PN, Epton MJ, Jennings LC, Kingham SP, 2011. Including viral infection data supports an association between particulate pollution and respiratory admissions. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Vol 35 (2), pp 163–169.
  • Kingham S, Sabel CE, Bartie P, 2011. The impact of the ‘school run’ on road traffic accidents: A spatio-temporal analysis. Journal of Transport Geography, Vol 19, pp 705–711.
  • Witten K, Pearce J, Day P, 2011. Neighbourhood Destination Accessibility Index: A GIS tool for measuring infrastructure support for neighbourhood physical activity. Environment and Planning A, Vol 43 (1), pp 205–223.
  • Day P, and Pearce J, 2011. Obesity-promoting food environments and the spatial clustering of food outlets around schools. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol 40 (2), pp 113-121.
  • Wilson JG, Kingham S, Pearce J, 2010. Air pollution and restricted activity days among New Zealand school children and staff. International Journal of Environment and Pollution. 41, (1/2), pp 140-154.
  • Barnett JR, and Pearce J, 2010. Ethnic differences in smoking cessation and cancer survival in New Zealand. In R. Taonui (ed), Nga Kete a Rehua Inaugural Maori Research Symposium Te Waipounamu Proceedings. (145-150). Christchurch: Aotahi: School of Maori and Indigenous Studies.
  • Moon G, Barnett R, Pearce J, 2010. Ethnic spatial segregation and tobacco consumption: a multilevel repeated cross-sectional analysis of smoking prevalence in urban New Zealand, 1981-1996. Environment and Planning A, Vol 42 (2), pp 469-486.
  • Richardson EA, Pearce J, Mitchell RJ, Day P, Kingham S. 2010. The association between green space and cause-specific mortality in urban New Zealand: an ecological analysis of green space utilityBMC Public Health 10(1):240.
  • Walton M, Pearce J, Day P, 2009. Examining the interaction between food outlets and outdoor food advertisements with primary school food environments. Health and Place, Vol 15, pp 811-818.
  • Thompson L, Barnett R, Pearce J, 2009. Scared straight?: Fear-appeal anti-smoking campaigns, risk, self-efficacy and addiction. Health, Risk and Society, Vol 11, pp 181-196.
  • Pearce J, Hiscock R, Moon G, Barnett R, 2009. The neighbourhood effects of geographical access to tobacco retailers on individual smoking behaviourJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Vol 63, pp 69-77.
  • Miller L, Pearce J, Barnett R, Willis J, Darlow B, Scott R, 2009. Is population mixing associated with childhood Type 1 diabetes in Canterbury, New Zealand? Social Science and Medicine, Vol 68, pp 625-630.
  • Barnett R, Pearce J, Moon G, 2009. Community inequality and smoking cessation in New Zealand, 1981-2006? Social Science and Medicine, Vol 68, pp 876-884.
  • Pearce J, Hiscock R, Blakely T, Witten K, 2009. A national study of the association between neighbourhood access to fast food outlets and the diet and weight of local residentsHealth and Place, Vol 15, pp 193-197.
  • Pearce J, 2009. Regression, linear and non-linear. In: N. Thrift and P. Kitchen, The International Encyclopedia of Human Geography (online), pp 302-308.
  • Thompson L, Pearce J, Barnett R, 2007. Moralising geographies: Stigma, smoking islands and responsible subjects. Area, Vol 39, pp 508-517.
  • Dorling D, Mitchell R, Pearce J, 2007. An observational study: the global impact of income inequality on health by age. British Medical Journal, Vol 335, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39349.507315.DE
  • Pearce J, 2007. Incorporating geographies of health into public policy debates: The GeoHealth Laboratory. New Zealand Geographer, Vol 63, pp 149-153.
  • Pearce J, 2007. Editorial: Investigating place effects on health: an Australasian perspective. Australasian Epidemiologist, Vol 14, pp 2-3.
  • Miller L, Pearce J, Barnett R, 2007. The place of population mixing in the aetiology of disease: a New Zealand perspective. Australasian Epidemiologist, Vol 14, pp 12-15.
  • Kingham S, Pearce J, Zawar-Reza P, 2007. Driven to injustice? Environmental justice and vehicle pollution in Christchurch, New Zealand. Transportation Research D: Transport and Environment, Vol 12, pp 254-263.
  • Pearce J, Blakely T, Witten K, Bartie P, 2007. Neighborhood deprivation and access to fast food retailing: a national study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol 32, pp 375-382.
  • Pearce J, Barnett R, Collings S, Jones I, 2007. Did geographical inequalities in suicide among males aged 15 to 44 in New Zealand increase during the period 1980-2001? Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol 41, pp 359-365.
  • "Put on a jacket, you wuss": Cultural identities and air pollution in Christchurch , New Zealand , Environment and Planning A, Vol 39 (12), pp 2883-2898.
  • Barnett P, and Barnett JR, 2006. New times, new relationships: mental health, primary care and public health in New Zealand . In: C. Milligan and D. Conradson (eds), Landscapes of Voluntarism: New Spaces of Health, Welfare and Governance. London: Policy Press, pp 73-90.
  • Barnett JR, Barnett P, Pearce J, Howes P, 2006. Reconsidering the role of a local diabetes society: Patterns of membership in Christchurch , New Zealand. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Vol 30, pp 275-278.
  • Barnett R, Pearce J, Howes P, 2006, ‘Help, educate, encourage?’: Geographical variations in the provision and utilisation of diabetes education in New Zealand. Social Science and Medicine, Vol 63, pp 1328-1343.
  • Barnett R, Barnett P, Pearce J, Howes P, 2006, Preventing the human time bomb? Barriers to utilising diabetes education in Christchurch, New Zealand. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Vol 30, pp 275-278.
  • Barnett JR and Brown LJ, 2006, Getting into hospitals in a big way: The corporate transformation of hospital care in Australia. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, Vol 24, pp 283–310.
  • Pearce J, Wheeler B, Dorling D, Barnett JR, Rigby J, 2006. Geographical inequalities in health in New Zealand, 1980-2001: the gap widens. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Vol 30, pp 461-466.
  • Pearce J, Barnett R, Kingham S, 2006. Slip! Slap! Slop! Cutaneous malignant melanoma incidence and social status in New Zealand, 1995-2000. Health and Place, Vol 12, pp 239-252.
  • Pearce J, and Dorling D, 2006. Increasing geographical inequalities in health in New Zealand, 1980-2001. International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol 35, pp 597-603.
  • Pearce J, and Dorling D, 2006. The place of population change in explaining geographical inequalities in health in New Zealand. International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol 35, pp 1099-1100.
  • Pearce J, Kingham S, Zawar-Reza P, 2006. Every Breath You Take? Environmental Justice and Air Pollution in Christchurch, New Zealand. Environment and Planning A, Vol 38, pp 919-938.
  • Pearce J, Witten K, Bartie P, 2006. Neighbourhoods and health: a GIS approach to measuring community resource accessibility. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Vol 60, pp 389-395.
  • Barnett P, and Barnett JR , 2005. Beyond the market: Recent trends in health service restructuring in New Zealand. In: P. Davis and K. Dews (eds), Health and Society in Aotearoa New Zealand (2nd edition). Auckland: Oxford University Press, pp 178-193.
  • Barnett R, Pearce J, Moon G, 2005. Does social inequality matter? Assessing the effects of changing ethnic socio-economic disparities on Maori smoking in New Zealand, 1981-96. Social Science and Medicine, Vol 60, pp 1515-1526.
  • Pearce J, and Boyle P, 2005. Is the urban excess in lung cancer in Scotland explained by patterns of smoking? Social Science and Medicine, Vol 60, pp 2833-2843.
  • Pearce J, and Boyle P, 2005. Examining the relationship between lung cancer and radon in small areas across Scotland. Health and Place, Vol 11, pp 275-282.
  • Wilson JG, Kingham S, Pearce J, Sturman AP, 2005. A review of intra-urban variations in particulate air pollution: implications for epidemiological research. Atmospheric Environment, Vol 39, pp 6444-6462.
  • Barnett JR, and Barnett P, 2004. Primary health care in New Zealand: Problems and policy approaches. Social Policy Journal of New Zealand, Vol 21, pp 49-66.
  • Barnett JR, Moon G, Kearns R, 2004. Social inequality and Maori smoking in New Zealand. Social Science and Medicine, Vol 59, pp 129-143.
  • Brabyn L, and Barnett JR, 2004. Deprivation and geographic access to general practitioners in rural New Zealand. New Zealand Medical Journal, Vol 117, pp 1-13.
  • Brown L, and Barnett JR, 2004. Is the corporate transformation of hospital creating a new health care space? A case study of the impact of the co-location of public and private hospitals in Australia. Social Science and Medicine, Vol 58, pp 427-444.
  • Barnett JR, and Lauer G, 2003. Urban deprivation and public hospital admissions in Christchurch 1990-1997. Health and Social Care in the Community, Vol 11, pp 299-313.
  • Barnett JR, and Barnett P, 2003. 'If you want to sit on your butts you'll get nothing!' Community activism in response to threats of rural hospital closure in southern New Zealand. Health and Place, Vol 9, pp 59-71.
  • Barnett JR, and Barnett P, 2003. Back to the future?: Reflections on past reforms and future prospects for health services In New Zealand. Geojournal, Vol 59, pp 137-147.
  • Kearns R, and Barnett JR, 2003. Placing private health care: reading Ascot hospital in the landscape of contemporary Auckland. Social Science and Medicine, Vol 56, pp 2303-2315.
  • Pearce J, Boyle P, Flowerdew R, 2003. Predicting smoking behaviour in census output areas across Scotland. Health and Place, Vol 9, pp 139-149.
  • Pearce J, 2003. Emerging new research on the geography of health and impairment. Health and Place, Vol 9, pp 107-108.
  • Barnett JR, 2001. Coping with the costs of primary care?: household and locational variations in the survival strategies of the urban poor. Health and Place, Vol 7, pp 141-157.
  • Dunn C, Kingham S, Rowlingson B, Bhopal R, Cockings S, Foy C, Acquilla S, Halpin J, Diggle P, Walker D, 2001. Analysing spatially referenced public health data: a comparison of three methodological approaches. Health and Place, Vol 7 (1), pp 1-12.
  • Barnett J R, Coyle P, Kearns R, 2000. Holes in the safety net?: Assessing the effects of targeted benefits upon the health care utilisation of poor New Zealanders. Health and Social Care in the Community, Vol 8, pp 1-13.
  • Kingham S, Briggs D, Elliott P, Fischer P, Lebret E, 2000. Differences in concentrations of traffic-related pollutants in indoor and outdoor air in relation to vehicle intensity in Huddersfield, England. Atmospheric Environment, Vol 34 (6), pp 905-916.