BIOL250-19S1 (C) Semester One 2019

Principles of Animal Physiology

15 points
18 Feb 2019 - 23 Jun 2019

Description

An introduction to the mechanisms of how the body works, concentrating on osmoregulation and excretion, digestion, nerves and muscles.

This is a broad-based, elementary course in animal physiology providing an introduction to the principal physiological systems in animals, how they operate and how they are regulated.

Topics include gas exchange, blood and circulation, osmoregulation and excretion, digestion, nervous and muscle systems, immunology, and endocrinology.

The treatment is comparative although human and mammalian physiology receives greatest emphasis. Selected examples from lower vertebrates and invertebrates are used to illustrate physiological principles.

Goals of the Course
The course is intended to provide a foundation for students following a range of biological interests, including ecology, behaviour, biochemistry, genetics and sports and health sciences. BIOL250 leads on to third year courses in advanced physiology (BIOL351 Cell Biology, BIOL354 Animal Ecophysiology, BIOL355 Neurons, Hormones and Behaviour).

Learning Outcomes

  • Develop knowledge about the functions of organs and tissues in the human body
  • Have an appreciation of how the parts of the body are linked into a functioning whole
  • Understand the principle of homeostasis and the methods used by the body to maintain this
  • Have practical knowledge of physiological techniques
  • Be able to write about physiological topics

    Principles are presented in lectures and developed in laboratories. These learning outcomes will be assessed via the tests and laboratory exercises.

    Transferable Skills
  • Practical operation of a physiological data recording system. (The PowerLab system, or the equivalent, is a critical tool in almost all real world scenarios that involve the recording of physiological data (e.g. exercise, research, and hospital laboratories).)
  • Analysing data. (Condensing raw data into meaningful values and then assessing the resulting trends is a key skill in a number of vocations, both within science and in other areas.)
  • Synthesising information. (Assimilating presented knowledge, integrating this with your own research, then communicating it effectively in your own words is a valuable skill applicable across almost a range of fields.)
  • Applying fundamental knowledge to applied settings. (The lab test in this course will test your fundamental understanding of processes and ask you to apply this to various scenarios, encouraging you to learn principles, rather than memorise information.)
  • Working as a team. (Many labs will require you to work in teams, a task that will involve
    effective organization, problem-solving, communication, co-ordination, and interpersonal attributes.)

Pre-requisites

Timetable 2019

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 11:00 - 12:00 A6 Lecture Theatre 18 Feb - 7 Apr
29 Apr - 2 Jun
Lecture B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 10:00 - 11:00 Ernest Rutherford 140 18 Feb - 7 Apr
29 Apr - 2 Jun
Lab A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 13:00 - 17:00 Ernest Rutherford 452 Biology Lab 18 Feb - 24 Feb
4 Mar - 10 Mar
18 Mar - 24 Mar
1 Apr - 7 Apr
6 May - 12 May
20 May - 26 May
02 Wednesday 14:00 - 18:00 Ernest Rutherford 452 Biology Lab 18 Feb - 24 Feb
4 Mar - 10 Mar
18 Mar - 24 Mar
1 Apr - 7 Apr
6 May - 12 May
20 May - 26 May
03 Monday 13:00 - 17:00 Ernest Rutherford 452 Biology Lab 18 Feb - 24 Feb
4 Mar - 10 Mar
18 Mar - 24 Mar
1 Apr - 7 Apr
6 May - 12 May
20 May - 26 May

Examination and Formal Tests

Test A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 18:30 - 20:30 K1 Lecture Theatre 29 Apr - 5 May

Timetable Note

Lab coats are required for this laboratory class and can be purchased at the beginning of the year.

It is compulsory to wear a lab coat in the laboratory and can be purchased at the beginning of the year.

Where to purchase your lab coats and safety glasses

PLEASE NOTE YOU NOW COLLECT FROM THE NEW ERNEST RUTHERFORD BUILDING.

To purchase: buy a receipt from the Copy Centre, 2nd floor, Puaka-James Hight building, (payment by eftpos and credit card only – lab coats $32, glasses $10), 9.00 am - 4.00 pm, Monday to Friday.

Receipts may then be exchanged in the atrium inside the southern entry to the Ernest Rutherford Building, 8.30 – 10 am and 1.30 – 2.30 pm, Monday to Friday for the first two weeks of the semester.

After the first two weeks they can be collected from Ernest Rutherford Room 130 (Chemical Store).

Course Coordinator / Lecturer

Bill Davison

Lecturers

Ximena Nelson and Elissa Cameron

Lab Technician

Jonathan Hill

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage 
Final exam 50%
Laboratory handout completion 10%
Laboratory Reports 15%
Mid-course test 25%

Textbooks / Resources

Recommended Reading

Campbell, Neil A.,1946-2004 et al; Biology :a global approach; Eleventh edition; Pearson Education Limited, 2018.

Randall, David J. et al; Eckert animal physiology : mechanisms and adaptations; Ed. 5; W.H. Freeman and Co, 2001.

Sherwood, Lauralee. , Klandorf, Hillar, Yancey, Paul H; Animal physiology : from genes to organisms; 2nd ed., International ed; Brooks/Cole ;Cengage Learning [distributor], 2013.

Silverthorn, Dee Unglaub et al; Human physiology : an integrated approach; 4th ed; Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 2007.

Notes

It is compulsory to wear a lab coat in the laboratory.

Additional Course Outline Information

Academic integrity

It is essential that you are aware that plagiarism is considered a very serious offence by the Academic community, the University and the School of Biological Sciences. Plagiarism is defined as taking content from another work or author and presenting it, without attribution, as if it is your own work. Content here includes text (sentences or major parts of sentences), display items (graphs and tables), and overall structure (the detailed sequence of ideas). Plagiarism includes:
• re-use of previous assignments (even if each individual sentence has been rephrased to say the same thing in different words, if the overall structure is re-used)  
• copying of another student’s work (with or without their consent)
• the unreferenced use of published material or material from the internet e.g. cutting and pasting of paragraphs or pages into an essay.
For most pieces of in-term assessment you will be given information concerning the use of direct and indirect quotes from previously published work. If you are in any doubt about appropriate use of published material, please speak with a member of academic staff. If you are still unsure what plagiarism is, then seek advice.

It is a School policy that courses may request you submit work electronically for subsequent analysis of originality using Turnitin. Students agree that by taking courses in BIOL, required papers may be subject to submission for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism.  All submitted papers will be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of such papers.  Use of the Turnitin.com service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Assessment and grading system

A+ 90% or above
A 85 – 90
A- 80 – 84
B+ 75 – 79
B 70 – 74
B- 65 – 69
C+ 60 – 64
C 55 – 59
C- 50 – 54

A restricted pass (R) may be awarded to those who are close to a pass (i.e. an overall score of 48-49.9%) AND who have achieved at least a 40% overall score in both in-course assessment and tests/exams. If an R grade is awarded you gain credit for the course but cannot continue into papers that require this course as a pre-requisite. NB. The R grade is only available at 100 and 200 level - it cannot be awarded for third year papers.

Failing grades:   D   40-49             E  0–39

Late submission of work

Reports and assignments should be handed in on time. Extensions may be granted if you have a valid reason. If you require an extension, you should request one from the course co-ordinator (or the lecturer responsible for marking the work), with as much notice as possible.  Please do this BEFORE the deadline for the assignment. If you have been given an extension you should hand the work DIRECTLY to the course coordinator (do not put it in the drop box as it may not be cleared after the due date).
If an extension has not been granted:
• work must be handed in by the due date to gain full credit
• work handed in up to 7 days after the deadline will be marked, but the marks will be discounted 25% before they are recorded to the student's credit
• any work handed in more than 7 days after the deadline date will not be marked or earn credit.

Notes

What if I have written more than the word or page limit?
If there is a word limit on an assignment, it is usually there to stop you doing too much work and to encourage you to write succinctly.  It also makes things easier to assess.  You can be up to 10% over without too much worry, but if the length increases beyond that your mark may suffer due to failure to follow the requirements.  If you find yourself way over the word limit have a chat to the lecturer concerned about how to trim your assignment to an acceptable length.

Requests for extensions

Reports and assignments should be handed in on time. Extensions may be granted if you have a valid reason. If you require an extension, you should request one from the course co-ordinator (or the lecturer responsible for marking the work), with as much notice as possible.  Please do this BEFORE the deadline for the assignment. If you have been given an extension you should hand the work DIRECTLY to the course coordinator (do not put it in the drop box as it may not be cleared after the due date).
If an extension has not been granted:
• work must be handed in by the due date to gain full credit
• work handed in up to 7 days after the deadline will be marked, but the marks will be discounted 25% before they are recorded to the student's credit
• any work handed in more than 7 days after the deadline date will not be marked or earn credit.

What do I do if I’m sick?

What do I do if I have to miss something or if my performance was impaired?
If you feel that illness, injury, bereavement or other extenuating circumstances beyond your control have prevented you from completing an item of assessment worth 10% or more of total course assessment or if these circumstances affected your performance in such assessments, you should apply for Special Consideration. Applications for Special Consideration should be submitted via the Examinations Office website http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations/general/general_regs_aegrotat.shtml and notify the course co-ordinator within five days of the assessment or its due date. If this is for medical reasons you should visit a doctor within 24 hours of the assessment (application form available on-line or from the Student Health Centre). The Special Consideration provisions are intended to assist students who have covered the work of a course but have been prevented by illness or other critical circumstances from demonstrating their mastery of the material or skills at the time of assessment – they do not excuse you from doing the assessment within a reasonable time agreed with the course co-ordinator. You should expect to be required to submit additional work if you miss a major assignment (e.g. a field trip for which a major write-up is required).

In rare cases you may not be able to complete an assessment or attend a field trip, because of involvement in international or national representative sport or cultural groups. In such cases you should also apply for Special Consideration. Please review the Special Considerations policy because very few kinds of activities will be eligible for consideration (e.g. holiday trips, birthday parties etc. are not given special status in the University policy).

Students prevented by extenuating circumstances from completing the course after the final date for withdrawing, may apply for Special Consideration for late discontinuation of the course. Applications must be submitted to the Examinations Office within five days of the end of the main examination period for the semester.

For further details on Special Consideration applications, please refer to the Examinations Office website http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations/general/general_regs_aegrotat.shtml.

What if I fail part of the course?

In BIOL, we require a satisfactory level of achievement in both the theoretical aspects of the discipline and in practical activities. This means you must attend all class activities and submit all items of assessment unless you have a very good reason not to (e.g. medical reasons). A student must attain an average score of at least 40% for in-course assessments (e.g. assignments, reports) and an average score of at least 40% in the exam and/or test, AND score at least 50% overall for the course, to be awarded a passing grade. See course outline for clarification of the assessment items included in each category and ask the coordinator if you are still unsure.

What’s the best way to give feedback?

We welcome constructive feedback at all times – help us to make this a valuable course for you.  We endeavour to remain approachable at all times.  If you would rather give feedback anonymously, please use the on-line course survey or talk to lab demonstrators, or your class rep (who will all report back to the staff-student liaison committee that includes a representative from each of the undergraduate classes). Class representatives will be selected from each class at the start of course.

What’s the best way to complain?

If you feel you have not been fairly treated during this course, please raise the issue with the lecturer or course co-ordinator in the first instance.  Other avenues include your class rep., who can raise issues anonymously, or the UCSA education coordinator.

Where to submit and collect work

All assignments should be placed in the designated collection box in the foyer of the 2nd floor of the School of Biological Sciences (near the main office), unless directed otherwise by the course co-ordinator. All assignments must be accompanied by a cover sheet signed by you stating that the submitted work is not plagiarised. Cover sheets are available on top of the collection boxes, or you can download one from the Biology website (under Undergraduate). In addition, you may also be asked to submit your work electronically (via Learn) for analysis in Turnitin. You will be given instructions on how to do this in the assignment handout.

Marked assignments can be collected from the Secretaries' Office, unless directed otherwise by the course co-ordinator. Teaching staff will endeavour to return work as soon as possible, and should contact you if there are likely to be any delays that will prevent return within the maximum 4-week timeframe.

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $883.00

International fee $4,000.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see School of Biological Sciences.

All BIOL250 Occurrences

  • BIOL250-19S1 (C) Semester One 2019