EURA104-20S2 (C) Semester Two 2020

European Languages in Europe and Beyond

15 points

Details:
Start Date: Monday, 13 July 2020
End Date: Sunday, 8 November 2020
Withdrawal Dates
Last Day to withdraw from this course:
  • Without financial penalty (full fee refund): Friday, 24 July 2020
  • Without academic penalty (including no fee refund): Friday, 25 September 2020

Description

This is a one semester course for students undertaking a first year course in European languages or European studies, and is open to all undergraduates irrespective of their discipline. It covers a range of topics relating to the languages of Europe: how they developed and spread as a group of languages, as isolates, or the way in which (inter) national languages of Europe developed. The course also looks at the place languages take in the European Union, and how the construction of Europe insists on protecting language diversity. No knowledge of languages other than English is needed to take this course.

This one semester is open for everyone irrespective of their discipline. It covers a range of topics relating to the languages of Europe on the European continent and beyond it, and studies EU policies that promote cultural and linguistic diversity, intercultural dialogue and social cohesion. The course explores contribution of multilingualism to EU economic prosperity, and considers key EU initiatives that emphasize the role and impact of linguistic and cultural heritage on local, regional and pan-European levels. Special attention is paid to the role of language in the cultural diplomacy of Europe and the EU towards the world, and New Zealand specifically.

The course combines insights into the intersection between linguistic and social issues including identity formation with basic understanding of linguistic structures of European languages.

In the former aspect, the course is answering the following questions: How are languages of Europe similar to or different from each other, linguistically? How do we compare languages to judge their similarities and differences objectively? How are the languages of Europe related? How do the linguistic history bear on the status of official languages and the support of minority languages?

In the latter aspect, languages of Europe are considered on regional, national and supranational levels. The course explores: What does language diversity mean for the peoples of Europe? How do different organisations and institutions - including the European Union - deal with the multilingual Europe and protection of language diversity?

The course also considers languages of Europe beyond Europe and examines historical and current realities of non-European societies speaking European languages in the context of these societies’ relations with Europe/ the EU. Special attention here goes to the potential of European languages to the EU’s and European member states public and cultural diplomacy.

The course facilitates awareness of multiculturalism and biculturalism in the context of Aotearoa New Zealand. It promotes students’ engagement with multiple perspectives of society, both locally and internationally (especially Europe). Students will also be able to interact confidently and appropriately with persons from a background different from their own as well as the ability to understand their selves and how this impacts engagement with others, tangata tū tangata ora.

The course feature guest presenters from European Languages programmes at UC, as well as UC Linguistics. The course involves alumni of this course (under- and post-graduate students) and facilitates their participation in small group discussions, following Tikanga practices.

A minimum of 40% in each term’s total is a condition for obtaining a pass in the course.

No knowledge of languages other than English is needed to take this course.

Learning Outcomes

1. This course will lay the foundation for more specialised European and EU Studies courses offered in the third and fourth years of the degree (EURO BA Honours), as well as other degrees: MEURO, MA (by thesis) and PhD in European Studies.

2. For those students who may not continue with European and EU Studies as a degree major, the course will offer a comprehensive introductory overview of the wider Europe and the EU in it – and their multicultural and diverse societies – which would complement their general educational experience and allow them to interact more knowledgeably in civil society and local communities.

3. At the end of this course, students will have developed:
 A basic awareness of European regional and minority languages, European national languages and linguistic and cultural diversity in the context of the European Union;
 EU linguistic and cultural policies in support of multilingualism
 A preliminary grasp of the history and development of Romance, Germanic, and Slavic languages and some linguistic isolates;
 Basic knowledge of key concepts and vocabulary for the understanding of European languages such as linguistic families, language planning, language standardisation, language acquisition and linguistic diversity;
 Sound writing skills in both the formulation and expression of an argument.

4. The course will provide an interdisciplinary and high quality academic insight to the challenging questions of European integration and European identities by looking at the role and impact of linguistic diversity and cultural heritage on local, regional and pan-European levels. The students will also be able to describe the role of languages policies in conflict prevention, post-conflict reconciliation and rebuilding destroyed cultural heritage as well as in cultural diplomacy of the EU and EU member states

5. The course will help students to engage with global and multi-cultural contexts, particularly from a disciplinary point of view and through considering the role of European languages beyond the borders of Europe. It will strengthen their own reflections about a language and culture in their own communities and in the context of bi-culturalism in Aotearoa New Zealand.

6. The inclusion of biculturalism will result in the students being competence in engaging in multiple perspectives of society, both locally and internationally (especially Europe). Students will also be able to interact confidently and appropriately with persons from a background different from their own as well as the ability to understand their selves and how this impacts engagement with others, tangata tū tangata ora.

7. The use of seminar and group discussion teaching methods will give undergraduate students the ability to hone their skills at analytical debating and develop their confidence in presenting their research. Effective work in groups and collaborations is a sought after skill and attribute in the modern-day working environment. Alumni of this course (under- and post-graduate students) will be involved as guest presenters and participants in small group discussions, following tikanga practices.

8. The course will also expand the opportunities for students to involve themselves in critical thinking concerning Europe and the EU at early levels of their academic career and allow for open discussions. This will facilitate skills in understanding, analysis and development of arguments and ideas within the discipline; and encourage students to think independently and employ specialist disciplinary knowledge to evaluate topics and issues.

9. Research-oriented assignments will allow students to tailor the course to their area of interest/future employment and to learn new research methods and practice their existing research and investigation skills. Students will use learned skills to research a topic. These connections between knowledge on the one side and skills and attributes on other is critical to benefit workplaces and communities.

University Graduate Attributes

This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attributes specified below:

Critically competent in a core academic discipline of their award

Students know and can critically evaluate and, where applicable, apply this knowledge to topics/issues within their majoring subject.

Employable, innovative and enterprising

Students will develop key skills and attributes sought by employers that can be used in a range of applications.

Biculturally competent and confident

Students will be aware of and understand the nature of biculturalism in Aotearoa New Zealand, and its relevance to their area of study and/or their degree.

Globally aware

Students will comprehend the influence of global conditions on their discipline and will be competent in engaging with global and multi-cultural contexts.

Restrictions

LING104, EULC104, EURO104

Equivalent Courses

Timetable 2020

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Monday 14:00 - 16:00 Karl Popper 413 13 Jul - 23 Aug
7 Sep - 18 Oct
Tutorial A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Friday 11:00 - 12:00 Psychology - Sociology 251 13 Jul - 23 Aug
7 Sep - 18 Oct

Course Coordinator / Lecturer

Natalia Chaban

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage  Description
Quizzes (6) 30% 5% each
Research report (2) 60% 30% each
Attendance and participation 10%

Textbooks / Resources

There is no single textbook for this course. The collection of selected readings will be available on LEARN or provided during lectures.

Other material, which may be helpful, can be found at the Library Subject Guide for European and EU Studies: http://canterbury.libguides.com/

Course links

LEARN The full Course Outline is available on LEARN (only for students enrolled in this course).

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $777.00

International fee $3,375.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Language, Social and Political Sciences.

All EURA104 Occurrences

  • EURA104-20S2 (C) Semester Two 2020