Waipiro me ngā whakapōauau | Understanding alcohol and other drugs

Drinking alcohol, smoking, vaping and the use of other drugs can have risks associated with your health, mood and mental health. It is important to be aware of the basic facts.

Alcohol

Excessive alcohol use can have a significant impact on our ability to think, make rational decisions, regulate emotions and control impulses. It can also impact balance and memory.

Excessive drinking can lead to:

  • Risky or dangerous behaviours
  • Violence
  • Accidents and injuries
  • Non-consensual or unsafe sex
  • Relationship breakdowns

Excessive drinking can have significant effects on health, some examples include:

  • Short term effects: Blurred vision, slurred and confused speech, clumsiness and difficulty walking, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of memories and much more. Read more about the short term effects.
  • Long term effects: Increased risk of developing cancer, liver and brain damage, lung inflammation, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease and much more. Read more about the long term effects.

Top tips for keeping yourself safe

If you are going to drink it is important to look after yourself and your mates. Following these guidelines from Alcohol.org.nz on low risk drinking can help reduce the risk of long term health effects and injury.

If you are going to drink, make sure you eat and have lots of water in between drinks as this will help to slow alcohol absorption.

Plan transport and accommodation in advance and make sure you let someone know where you are at all times. Make sure your friends get home safely.

Hosting a party?

If you are hosting a party register it on Good One. Good One is all about helping you have a great party without things getting hairy. Check out their Good One website for more information and tips on being a great host.

Tips and advice on hosting a party.

Smoking

The University of Canterbury is proud to be a smoke free campus (this applies to e-cigarettes and personal vaporisers as well as tobacco). However, we do understand that it can be difficult to stop smoking. If you are looking to quit and need some support, you can contact Quitline for free advice on 0800 778 778, or alternatively you can contact the UC Health Centre.  

Drugs

The University of Canterbury does not condone the use of illegal drugs.

However, we do recognise that we live in a world where drugs do exist.

Like alcohol, excessive drug use can have serious effects on your health and wellbeing. If you are concerned about yourself or somebody else you can check out the NZ Drug Foundation for more information. Alternatively for free advice you can phone the Alcohol Drug Helpline on 0800 787 797.

If you are concerned about your own alcohol or drug use or someone you know, the UC Health Centre can help. Alternatively you can check out other services available at UC.

Need More Information?

Alcohol:

Drink Check – Is your drinking okay?

Alcohol.org.nz

Alcohol effects on the body

Smoking:

Health Navigator NZ – How and why to quit smoking

Ministry of Health on smoking

Smokefree.org.nz

Drugs:

Drug Help

NZ Drug Foundation

NZ Drug Foundation – Resources

New Zealand Police – Drugs and Alcohol Getting Help

Need Help?

Finding support

24/7 support

Alcohol Drug Helpline0800 787 797 or Text 8681

Healthline: 0800 611 116

If you require urgent or crisis mental health care please call Crisis Resolution on 0800 920 092 or dial 111.