UC researchers providing solutions for first responders

22 October 2013

University of Canterbury researchers are investigating wireless security issues and providing solutions for first responders to operate safely and efficiently.

October 22, 2013

 

University of Canterbury researchers are investigating wireless security issues and providing solutions for first responders to operate safely and efficiently.

 

UC’s Wireless Research Centre at NZi3 is researching much of the work for Tait Communications which has given the university $1.5 million over the next three years to help with these and other projects.

 

Wireless centre senior research leader Dr Graeme Woodward says UC has had a long history of working with Tait. 

 

``Our recent work has led to at least two patents for Tait. One in the area of macrodiversity to improve cellular network coverage and performance and the other in the area of power control to optimise the transmission power of terminals to maximise individual performance while minimising interference on other users within the system.

 

``We do a lot of work on wireless communications and we are increasingly looking across entire systems to find whole system solutions.

 

``We exchange staff between our two centres. Our staff spends time within Tait’s Innovation Centre and we have a hot desk available for Tait staff within NZi3.

 

``We are also working on use of unmanned aerial vehicles and integration of sensors, particularly positioning (GPS), into systems including wireless communications.

 

``The Wireless centre has developed a sophisticated modelling capability of the 3GPP LTE (Long Term Evolution) global wireless standard, which is being deployed by network operators around the world (often marketed as “4G”).

 

``It is also the chosen technology for future public safety networks within the USA, Asia-Pacific and other places in the world. This model, amongst many other features, will predict data throughputs, error rates and geographic coverage of LTE systems over a wide range of deployment scenarios. 

 

``It is very highly configurable, allowing exploration of new innovations beyond the current standardisation. Access to this model and the associated expertise within our centre enables Tait to explore the performance of future networks and assists them in the efficient design of future products and services for the public safety and utility markets.’’

 

Woodward says UC is also working with Tait on addressing the transition of traditional voice-only public safety communication networks to data-enabled networks. 

 

The inclusion of broadband data opens up a raft of new possibilities to enhance the effectiveness, safety and efficiency of public safety responders. 

 

The Wireless Research Centre is assisting with many of the communications challenges. The UC Spatial Engineering Centre is contributing towards technologies to aid positioning and development of new platforms such as unmanned aerial vehicles.