School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Te Kura Matū Seminar Series

The use of sulfur in aqueous carbohydrate chemistry

Speaker

Stewart R. Alexander, PhD Oral, Supervisor: Professor Antony J. Fairbanks

Institute

Chemistry in the School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Te Kura Matū, University of Canterbury

Time & Place

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 10:00:00 NZDT in Rutherford Room 531

All are welcome

Abstract

Carbohydrates play critical roles in a number of biological systems, including cell-cell recognition and signalling, regulation of protein transport, and receptor activation.1 Carbohydrates are typically found as glycoconjugates: carbohydrates attached to other biomolecules, such as proteins or lipids. Synthetic glycoconjugates have great potential to improve the treatments for a wide range of diseases, and can also be effective vaccines. Carbohydrates and carbohydrate mimics can also interact with a wide range of biological pathways, meaning that techniques for the synthesis of a range of carbohydrate and carbohydrate-derived species are in high demand. However, the modification of carbohydrates and the synthesis of glycoconjugates is often challenging, requiring multiple protection/deprotection steps, and so simple, widely applicable methods for the modification of carbohydrates and the synthesis of glycoconjugates are highly desirable.2, 3

The research I have carried out focuses on the application of sulfur’s unique features to the preparation of glycoconjugates and glycosidase inhibitors without the use of protecting groups, over a minimal number of steps, in water.

References

  1. Ohtsubo, K.; Marth, J. D., Cell 2006, 126 (5), 855-867.
  2. Villalonga, M. L.; Díez, P.; Sánchez, A.; Gamella, M.; Pingarrón, J. M.; Villalonga, R., Chem. Rev. 2014, 114 (9), 4868-4917.
  3. Villadsen, K.; Martos-Maldonado, M. C.; Jensen, K. J.; Thygesen, M. B., ChemBioChem 2017, 18 (7), 574-612.

 

 All Welcome