Seminar Series

Catastrophic Landscape Modification from a Landslide Tsunami in Taan Fiord, Alaska

Speaker

Colin Bloom

Institute

Time & Place

Thu, 11 Mar 2021 16:00:00 NZDT in ER263

All are welcome

Abstract

On October 17th 2015, a massive landslide at the terminus of the rapidly retreating Tyndall Glacier in Southeast Alaska sent over 50 million cubic meters of rock into Taan Fiord. The resulting tsunami reached elevations as high as 193 m and scoured vegetation kilometers from the source. Field and remote sensing investigations following the event, presented here, reveal low-lying fan deltas that may preserve geomorphic evidence of the tsunami for decades to centuries.

 

https://canterbury.zoom.us/rec/share/7cawJsYJGET8uNEy5hlQ9bqpheZx3M0Wa2SLa6Cd2B1qkYjjRUBrHvtodJdgQ8lO.rHF9yaHckqPpT77l

Biography

Movie produced for the US National Park Service about the work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwjOP6FApsA

 

Associated papers

Bloom, C.K., et al. 2020. Catastrophic landscape modification from a massive landslide tsunami in Taan Fiord, Alaska. Geomorphology 353, 107029.

https://www-sciencedirect-com.ezproxy.canterbury.ac.nz/science/article/pii/S0169555X19305215

Higman, B., Bloom, C. et al., 2018. The 2015 landslide and tsunami in Taan Fiord, Alaska. Scientific Reports 8, 12993. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-30475-w

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-30475-w