UC innovation that is good for the world

09 May 2019

Innovation is good for the world, and University of Canterbury (UC) researchers will explain how their innovative technological solutions are making a difference – from Antarctica to Africa – during Techweek on 22 and 23 May.

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    Revolutionary 3D x-ray colour scanning was invented at the University of Cantebrury by father and son academics. The MARS spectral x-ray scanner will revolutionise medical imaging globally because it provides far greater detail of the body’s chemical components.

Innovation is good for the world, and University of Canterbury (UC) researchers will explain how their innovative technological solutions are making a difference – from Antarctica to Africa – during Techweek on 22 and 23 May.  ­

On 23 May, nine public talks (run in three concurrent programmes) around the themes of Digital Disruption, Improving Human Wellbeing, and Animal Planet, show how research coming out of UC is solving current challenges – and how UC students and staff are making a difference.

What if we could ‘read’ the brain? Could this technology help solve crimes? UC neural engineering Adjunct Professor Richard Jones explains where Forensic Brainwave Analysis could take the law profession.

Political scientist Associate Professor Amy Fletcher, from UC’s Political Science & International Relations department, asks whether we could, or should, bring back animals from extinction using ancient DNA and cloning. With the UN report released this week suggesting that one million animals are in danger of extinction, this is a particularly timely discussion.

Gateway Antarctica scientist Dr Michelle LaRue’s citizen science projects in Antarctica offers the chance for anyone with an internet connection to join in and help count crabeater seals on the Antarctic ice. This research could support the establishment of a large marine protected area (MPA) in the Weddell Sea.

Meanwhile, UC Mechanical Engineering students Grace Elliot and Ella Guy spent their summer break in Uganda, learning how to repair life-saving hospital equipment in developing countries.

And then there are talks about bug tracking for biosecurity with drones, artificial intelligence and the survival of humanity, 3D x-ray colour scanning, and a Red Zone community storytelling project. The entire event is free and will be held in the University’s new Rehua building, on Forestry Road.

The national Techweek event was created to support collaboration and celebrate New Zealand’s rapidly growing technology and innovation sectors. At UC, Techweek is an opportunity to hear from three researchers in 90 minutes and learn about innovative new developments that are good for the world.

Register to attend the UC Innovation That Is Good For the World evening on 23 May, 5pm – 8pm, for free here (https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/events/active/uc-events/uc-innovation-that-is-good-for-the-world---techweek-2019.html).

Also during Techweek 19 is the upcoming UC Connect lecture Inspired by Nature: Engineering as an Art Form presented by UC Mechanical Engineer Professor Deborah Munro, on 22 May. To learn about biomimicry and how studying natural movement informed her best solutions for designing everything from robotic dinosaurs to orthopaedic implants and prostheses, register here. This event is also free, but registrations are essential.

For further information please contact:

UC Communications

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