UC launches South Island translation Master’s degree

27 November 2019

Practical training and applied language learning opportunities, with specialisation on crisis translation and interpreting, are being offered to graduates from 2020 through UC’s new Master of Applied Translation and Interpreting (MATI).

  • Charlotte Walker is completing a Bachelor of Arts (BA) double major in Linguisti

    Charlotte Walker is completing a Bachelor of Arts (BA) double major in Linguistics and Chinese, minor in European and European Union Studies, and Matthew Croft a BA double major in Japanese and Chinese, at UC.

Practical training and applied language learning opportunities, with specialisation on crisis translation and interpreting, are being offered to graduates from 2020 through UC’s new Master of Applied Translation and Interpreting (MATI).

The new qualification builds on an existing advanced paper already offered by UC on the theory and practice of translation for graduates skilled in two or more languages. Academic staff from across UC’s Department of Global, Cultural and Language Studies, led by Associate Professor Evgeny Pavlov, contributed to the development of the new MATI degree.

“We’re pleased to be able to cater to the needs of our communities here,” says Dr Susan Bouterey, UC Acting Head of Department in Global, Cultural and Language Studies. “What makes our programme unique is that we will be drawing on the experience of the Christchurch earthquakes, within our specialisation on crisis translation and interpreting. Being an interpreter in a natural disaster or other crisis situations is a very demanding role that requires proper training. We aim to provide that in the MATI programme.”

This highly practical postgraduate degree includes the option to complete an internship, under the auspices of Professional & Community Engagement (PACE) guidelines, with UC committed to finding placements for as many students as possible.

“Students will also have the opportunity to study abroad and I think many will see that as a very attractive part of the degree too.”

It is anticipated that up to 10 students will be in the first intake of this new degree, which can be studied full-time over 12 to 18 months. There has been strong interest in the programme from both new and former graduates.

“We are confident that there will be a lot of demand for UC’s MATI graduates, both in New Zealand and internationally. There is an ongoing need for translation and interpreting services in areas such as medicine, the media and entertainment, tourism, marketing and various government agencies so our graduates will be able to apply their skills in many different areas.”

The University of Auckland and AUT offer master-level degrees in translation and interpreting and Victoria University of Wellington offers a Master of Intercultural Communication and Applied Translation, however UC’s new MATI degree brings advanced translation and interpreting to the South Island for the first and adds specialisation on crisis translation and interpreting.

For further information please contact:

UC Communications

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