Michael Tarren-Sweeney awarded UC Innovation Medal

07 December 2016

UC's Innovation Medal has been awarded to Associate Professor Michael Tarren-Sweeney, who developed the Assessment Checklist Series.

Michael Tarren-Sweeney awarded UC Innovation Medal

UC's Innovation Medal has been awarded to Associate Professor Michael Tarren-Sweeney, who developed the Assessment Checklist Series.

Associate Professor Michael Tarren-Sweeney – UC Innovation Medal 2016

The University of Canterbury’s Innovation Medal has been awarded to Associate Professor Michael Tarren-Sweeney, who developed the Assessment Checklist Series; a set of psychiatric scales that measure a range of mental-health difficulties experienced by severely maltreated children.

The series is important for the mental-health assessment of maltreated children, and means they can be provided with the most appropriate psychological treatments.

An important breakthrough in the delivery of mental-health care for vulnerable children in New Zealand and abroad, the acclaimed measures have been used in over 30 published studies.

Assoc Prof Tarren-Sweeney has been instrumental in developing UC’s Child and Family Psychology programme.

UC Innovation Medal

The Innovation Medal is awarded by the University Council for excellence in transforming knowledge or ideas so they are adopted by the wider community in ways that contribute beneficial value. It is the University’s highest recognition of an outstanding innovator.

For further information please contact:
Margaret Agnew, Senior External Relations Advisor, University of Canterbury
Phone: +64 3 369 3631 | Mobile: +64 275 030 168 | margaret.agnew@canterbury.ac.nz
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