Incompetency Training in Making Tough Decisions

28 July 2016

Incompetency training is often highly effective in committing trainees and entire nations to bad to disastrous actions, according to US marketing expert Prof Arch Woodside.

Incompetency Training in Making Tough Decisions

Attend visiting Erskine Fellow Prof Arch Woodside's UC Connect public lecture to learn tools that help to increase vigilance and reduce the impact of incompetency training, with particular relevance to those interested in business strategy, marketing and human resources.

An upcoming public lecture from an American professor of marketing will look at the wisdom behind the quote: “It's not what we don't know that hurts. It's what we know that ain't so.” (Will Rodgers).

Incompetency training is often highly effective in committing trainees and entire nations to engage in bad to disastrous actions, according to marketing expert and visiting Erskine Fellow, Professor Arch G. Woodside, Boston College, United States, in his upcoming UC Connect public lecture at the University of Canterbury. 

Slavery as God's will, the reasoning behind the ‘Stolen Generations’ of  indigenous children, the pre-war ‘weapons of mass destruction’ propaganda by US President George W. Bush, and the use of ‘product portfolio planning’ tools such as the Boston Consulting Group's growth-share matrix are examples of such high-impact training activities and bad outcomes.

Incompetency training is pervasive and often non-apparent to trainees and trainers, Prof Woodside says. Learning how to be competent is insufficient for avoiding the powerful influences of incompetency training. 

His presentation answers two questions:

  • What tools do educators, executives, politicians, and people knowingly and unknowingly use that increase incompetence in thinking, deciding and doing? 
  • What steps are useful to take to reduce highly effective incompetency training? 

Attend Prof Woodside's UC Connect public lecture to learn tools that help to increase vigilance and reduce the impact of incompetency training, with relevance to those interested in business strategy, marketing and human resources. 

Arch Woodside is Professor of Marketing at Boston College, and at the time of the lecture he will be Professor of Marketing, Curtin University, Perth. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Global Scholars in Marketing Science, the top Asian journal in marketing management.  Prof Woodside has completed 700+ publications in marketing, psychology, management, and hospitality/tourism appearing in 50+ different academic journals as well as 50+ authored and edited books. 

He received a PhD in Business Administration from Pennsylvania State University, 1968; Doctor of Letters from Kent State University, USA, 2015; and an honorary doctorate degree, University of Montreal, 2013.  He is a member and Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the American Psychological Association, the Association of Psychological Science, the Global Innovation and Management Academy, the International Academy for the Study of Tourism, the Society for Marketing Advances; the Global Academy of Management and Marketing Associations (GAMMA). 

His latest book (2016) is Bad to Good: Achieving High Quality and Impact in Your Research (Emerald Publishing).  Prof Woodside has written on the high impact of incompetent research now pervasive in academic research - and how to break the death-grip of bad theory and bad data analysis tools in research in marketing (e.g., widespread inappropriate overuse of multiple regression analysis).  Most of his research is available at his website: archwoodside.com.

UC Connect public lecture: Incompetency and Competency Training in Making Tough Decisions, Erskine Fellow Professor Arch G. Woodside, August 3, 7pm, C2, at the University of Canterbury.

Register to attend at: www.canterbury.ac.nz/ucconnect

For further information please contact:
Margaret Agnew, Senior External Relations Advisor, University of Canterbury
Ph: (03) 364 2775 | Mobile: 027 5030 168 | margaret.agnew@canterbury.ac.nz
Tweet UC @UCNZ and follow UC on Facebook

SClair

NZ business leader in plant-based medicine earns PhD

Since founding natural healthcare company Artemis in 1998, Sandra Clair has played a key role in advocating for plant-based medicines to be recognised ...

Harris

Seven UC students and grads to learn how Asia does business

A third of the 21 New Zealand students and recent graduates embarking on internships to learn how Asia does business are from the University of ...