Majority of students check Facebook daily

04 April 2013

A University of Canterbury psychology masters student, Milesa Cepe, has found 93 per cent of high school and university students check Facebook at least once a day.

Majority of students check Facebook daily - Imported from Legacy News system

Masters student Milesa Cepe.

A University of Canterbury psychology masters student, Milesa Cepe, has found 93 per cent of high school and university students check Facebook at least once a day.

High school students, in general, spend more time on Facebook than university students.

"My researched showed 56 per cent of high school students spent at least 15 minutes to an hour on Facebook within any given session. On the other hand, 54 per cent of university students spent five to 15 minutes. The difference may be due to high school students having less academic pressure and, therefore, having more time to spend on Facebook.

"For high school students, the more they checked Facebook the lower were their grades. Almost 40 per cent of high school students who checked Facebook between 21 to 31 plus times a day either had low grades or failed. Whereas 49 per cent of students who checked Facebook up to just four times a day had grades that were merit and above.

"Checking Facebook more often does not necessarily mean this is the reason why the students achieved or not achieved. The students may already be struggling academically and Facebook is used as a tool to relieve academic stress.

"It’s important to note the 60 per cent of students who had high Facebook usage (21 to 31 plus times a day) also achieved merit and above. 

"Facebook may not necessarily be distracting for students. Other factors may be involved such as parenting and social background. It also depends how people use it. Facebook groups can be used to connect class mates together for study, it can allow people to share ideas for assignments and it can provide social support for students who are too shy to talk to a classmate in person."

Cepe said parenting style can have a large impact on academic achievement. Seventy-five percent of high school students who had authoritative parents with clear and realistic expectations of their children achieved merits and above. Similarly, 90 per cent of university students who had authoritative parents achieved between A minus and A plus.

On the other hand, 64 per cent of students who had less supportive parents failed NCEA. Likewise, 36 per cent of university students who had these types of parents had grades that were C+ and below.

Behaviour such as a tendency to procrastinate and be easily distracted also had an influence. Cepe said students who did not procrastinate or were not distracted had higher academic grades.

Cepe surveyed 106 high school students and their parents and 211 university students and their parents in the research, which was supervised by Dr Verena Pritchard and Professor Simon Kemp.

 

For further information please contact:
Kip Brook
Media Consultant
Student Services and Communications
University of Canterbury
Ph: (03) 364 3325
Mobile: 027 5030 168
kip.brook@canterbury.ac.nz