Computer Science professor receives distinguished researcher award

20 September 2011

University of Canterbury academic Professor Tanja Mitrovic has been awarded a Distinguished Researcher Award from the Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education (APSCE).

Computer Science professor receives distinguished researcher award

Professor Tanja Mitrovic

University of Canterbury academic Professor Tanja Mitrovic (Computer Science and Software Engineering) has been awarded a Distinguished Researcher Award from the Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education (APSCE).

The APSCE awards two Distinguished Researcher Awards every two years in recognition of active APSCE members who have produced internationally-recognised research outputs and demonstrated distinguished academic accomplishments and contributions to the field of Computers in Education.

Professor Mitrovic is currently Head of the University's Computer Science and Software Engineering department and the research leader of the Intelligent Computer Tutoring research group. 

She recently received a Marsden Grant for leading a research team in a three-year project that will explore adaptive computer-based cognitive training for post-stroke rehabilitation. She has also recently chaired the 15th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, a biennial international conference for high quality research in intelligent systems and cognitive science for educational computing applications, which was held in Auckland in July.

Professor Mitrovic was nominated for the award by Professor Tsukasa Hirashima from Hiroshima University, Japan, for her contributions to the field of Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs).

“The Intelligent Computer Tutoring Group (ICTG) is one of the worldwide leaders in researching intelligent educational systems that adapt to the needs, abilities and knowledge of their students,” Professor Mitrovic said.

Professor Mitrovic has established Constraint-Based Modeling as one of the two leading methodologies for ITSs. ICTG has deployed and evaluated this methodology successfully in a Computer Science and Engineering curriculum as well as in a range of English and foreign language acquisition courses.

“The tutoring systems produced by the ICTG target complex domains that require sophisticated modeling and reasoning techniques. ICTG has developed a large number of various constraint-based tutors, which have been used in real classrooms regularly since 1998. The thorough evaluation of those systems shows that they are extremely effective in supporting students’ learning, and result in significant improvement in learning performance.”

She will formally receive her award at the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education (ICCE 2011) to be held in Thailand in November where she will be presented with an award certificate, US$1000 prize money and receive nomination for keynote speaker at the next ICCE conference.  

For more information please contact:
comms@canterbury.ac.nz.

 

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