SPAN205-20S1 (C) Semester One 2020

Journey through Hispanic Civilisation and Culture

15 points

Details:
Start Date: Monday, 17 February 2020
End Date: Sunday, 21 June 2020
Withdrawal Dates
Last Day to withdraw from this course:
  • Without financial penalty (full fee refund): Friday, 28 February 2020
  • Without academic penalty (including no fee refund): Friday, 8 May 2020

Description

This course employs a historical approach to study Hispanic civilisation and culture. The first part of the course will focus on Spanish history and culture and the second part will be devoted to the history and the culture of Latin America. This course does not require any previous knowledge of Spanish as it will be taught in English.

SPAN205 is a half-year course designed to introduce the student to significant people, events, places and cultural practices throughout the Spanish-speaking world from the early days of their civilisations until the present. This course employs a historical approach to study Hispanic culture, thus creating an inter-textual dialogue between the past and the present. It is structured so that the first part of the course will focus on Spanish history and culture, and the second part will be dedicated to the history and the culture of Latin America; emphasis will be placed throughout the course on their interaction and its consequences. Since it is impossible to cover in depth all aspects of civilisations that have existed for a period of more than 2,000 years, the course will cover only those features most important to the exploration of the ways in which both Spain and Latin America have evolved to its present state.  

This course does not require any knowledge of Spanish as it is taught in English.


Expectations
1. Attendance and participation. Students in this course are expected to attend classes regularly, arrive on time, and participate actively. The textbook used for SPAN205 is designed to be an informative useful tool which we will use throughout the course; however, other sources for learning about different aspects of Hispanic history and culture will also be used in class.

2. Independent Learning. In this course, you are expected to complement classes with your own independent learning. Students are expected to do the readings prior to class, and be prepared to discuss them, and engage in a variety of topics. Homework is assigned primarily for your benefit as part of class preparation. Understand that you are responsible for all the material listed on the syllabus as well as the material given in class by your instructor.

3. Assignments. You are also expected to complete and submit all your assignments in a timely fashion. Late work will be accepted only if it falls within the definition of excused absence*. Keep in mind that there is no make up of missed class-work or tests in the event of an unexcused absence. Make sure you talk to your instructor about any attendance problems.

* An excused absence is when you are not able to attend class due to medical reasons, participation on a national level sports competition, or due to an emergency situation beyond your control. In any such cases, please inform your lecturer or course co-ordinator as soon as reasonably possible.

4. Finally, LEARN (Moodle) constitutes an important communication tool for the course: it will be used regularly to upload relevant material and as a virtual forum and notice board. Therefore, you are expected to check it and your emails regularly.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course students will …
1. Have a general overview and understanding of the history and the development of Spanish and Latin American culture and civilization, and their inter-textual dialogue between the past and the present, through the knowledge of major events and important movements, figures, and influences on and from Spain and Latin America throughout history.
2. Have an understanding of the multifaceted nature of the people who inhabit Spain and Latin America today, and be able to develop a sense of solidarity with the hopes, dreams and struggles of the people in Latin America.
3. Have a general knowledge of the major European/Spanish and Latin American cultural and artistic movements, and of a variety of examples of art, literature and architecture of Spain and the native people of the Americas before the conquest, as well as artistic, literary and architectural examples resulting of the cultural blending after the conquest. By analogy, this knowledge can make students more attuned to bicultural contexts in the modern world.
4. Have developed intellectual curiosity and be able to comprehend the influence of global conditions on Spain and Latin America and, thus, acquired enhanced global and intercultural understanding and competency in engaging with global and multi-cultural contexts.
5. Have acquired a heightened understanding of biculturalism in New Zealand, by reflecting on and establishing parallels between the processes of colonization of Hispanic America and Aotearoa.
6. Be able to conduct research and write some appropriate length papers (informative and analytical) on Spanish and Latin American culture.
7. Show a good level of critical thinking and argumentative skills, thus further engraining critical competence in students, which extends far beyond Spanish studies, through active participation in class and the writing up of the analytical essay.

University Graduate Attributes

This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attributes specified below:

Critically competent in a core academic discipline of their award

Students know and can critically evaluate and, where applicable, apply this knowledge to topics/issues within their majoring subject.

Biculturally competent and confident

Students will be aware of and understand the nature of biculturalism in Aotearoa New Zealand, and its relevance to their area of study and/or their degree.

Globally aware

Students will comprehend the influence of global conditions on their discipline and will be competent in engaging with global and multi-cultural contexts.

Pre-requisites

Any 15 points at 100 level from SPAN, or
any 60 points at 100 level from the Schedule V of the BA.

Restrictions

Timetable 2020

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Monday 12:00 - 13:00 Jack Erskine 121 17 Feb - 5 Apr
27 Apr - 31 May
Lecture B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 12:00 - 13:00 Jack Erskine 121 17 Feb - 5 Apr
27 Apr - 31 May
Lecture C
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Friday 12:00 - 13:00 Jack Erskine 121 17 Feb - 5 Apr
27 Apr - 31 May

Course Coordinator / Lecturer

Victoria Escaip

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage  Description
Test 1 01 Apr 2019 30%
Test 2 29 May 2019 30%
Analytical essay 1 29 Apr 2019 15%
Analytical Essay 2 07 Jun 2019 15%
Participation 10% Weekly attendance and class discussion

Textbooks / Resources

Recommended Reading

Fuentes, Carlos; The buried mirror : reflections on Spain and the New World; 1st Mariner Books ed; Houghton Mifflin, 1999.

Some additional materials will be handed out in class. Links for additional material for homework and/or self-learning will be posted on Learn.

Other material, which may be helpful, can be found in the Library Subject Guides: http://canterbury.libguides.com/span

Course links

Library portal
LEARN The full Course Outline is available on LEARN (only for students enrolled in this course).

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $777.00

International fee $3,375.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Language, Social and Political Sciences.

All SPAN205 Occurrences

  • SPAN205-20S1 (C) Semester One 2020