PHIL132-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018

God, Mind, and Freedom

15 points
16 Jul 2018 - 18 Nov 2018

Description

If God created the universe, who created God? Are the colours you see inside your head or outside? Could a computer be conscious? You cannot change the past - why do you think you can change the future? This course is a beginner's guide to Philosophy. Learn to question assumptions and think outside the box. There are no prerequisites for this course - all welcome.

Not only is philosophy one of the most interesting and challenging subjects, it teaches skills that employers want: thinking outside the box, logic, ethics, and excellent writing and communication skills. At UC you can do either a BA or a BSc in Philosophy, or combine a Philosophy major with the LLB, BCom, or another degree.

BA or BSc students who major in philosophy must normally take at least two 100-level PHIL courses, plus at least three 200-level PHIL courses (including PHIL233), plus at least 60-points from 300-level PHIL courses (including at least one course from this list: PHIL305; PHIL310; PHIL311; and PHIL317). For more information see the BA regulations and/or the BSc regulations.

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is that you will learn to


  • Think independently, question assumptions, and assess evidence for conflicting views
  • Communicate clearly and precisely about conceptual problems, and use evidence-based reasoning, both orally and in written reports
    • University Graduate Attributes

      This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attributes specified below:

      Critically competent in a core academic discipline of their award

      Students know and can critically evaluate and, where applicable, apply this knowledge to topics/issues within their majoring subject.

      Employable, innovative and enterprising

      Students will develop key skills and attributes sought by employers that can be used in a range of applications.

Restrictions

PHIL101

Timetable 2018

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 17:00 - 18:00 A2 Lecture Theatre 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Lecture B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Thursday 17:00 - 18:00 A2 Lecture Theatre 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Tutorial A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 18:00 - 19:00 Karl Popper 612 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
02 Monday 10:00 - 11:00 Karl Popper 612 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
03 Wednesday 12:00 - 13:00 Ernest Rutherford 465 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
04 Thursday 15:00 - 16:00 E14 Lecture Theatre 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
05 Friday 11:00 - 12:00 Okeover 106 (Okeover Room) 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct

Timetable Note

Note: the tutorial is highly recommended (but not compulsory).

Course Coordinator / Lecturer

Diane Proudfoot

Lecturer

Jack Copeland

Contact Diane or Jack for further information.

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage 
Essay 1 20%
Essay 2 50%
Test 1 30%


Assessment to be arranged.

There is no final examination in this course.

Textbooks

Brian Davies, An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion, 3rd edition (Oxford University Press, 2004). Copies are available in UBS and on 3-hour loan in the High Demand Collection in the Library.

Jack Copeland, Artificial Intelligence: A Philosophical Introduction (Blackwell-Wiley, e-book 2015). Printed copies are available in UBS and on 3-hour loan in the High Demand Collection in the Library.

Numerous readings, videos, and audio files are also available in the course site on Learn.

Course links

Library portal
Philosophy Essay Writing Guide (available to all enrolled Philosophy students)

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $746.00

International fee $3,038.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Humanities and Creative Arts.

All PHIL132 Occurrences

  • PHIL132-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018