MKTG240-19S1 (C) Semester One 2019

Tourism, Hospitality & Events Management

15 points
18 Feb 2019 - 23 Jun 2019

Description

This course exposes students to the tourism system and critically discusses its components. The course equips students with an understanding of tourism, hospitality and events industry globally and in New Zealand.

The foundations of the tourism system and its components are critically evaluated. Lectures and assessments introduce students to the tourism, hospitality and events industry at global, national and local levels. Core management and marketing activities in these industries are outlined and discussed. The role, use and management of cultural resources for tourism purposes is emphasized.

Relationship to Other Courses
This course is a prerequisite for MKTG317 (Sustainable Tourism Enterprises) and recommended for MKTG314 (Tourism Marketing and Management)

Course Overview
The course is designed to introduce students to the tourism, hospitality and event industries and their key components. Students will also be exposed to planning and marketing activities in the tourism industry. The assigned readings and lectures will also help students to understand the impacts of tourism on individuals, organizations and communities, with a particular emphasis on cultural resources.

Expected Workload
Lectures 24
Lecture Preparation 24
Essay 30
Applied Project 50
Class Test and Preparation 22
Total 150

Learning Outcomes

  • At the completion of the course, successful students will be able to:
  • LO1: Describe the tourism system and critically evaluate its components
  • LO2: Assess the role of hospitality and events in supporting the tourism industry and its impacts (economic, socio-cultural, and environmental)
  • LO3: Evaluate the strategy and marketing activities in the tourism, hospitality and events industry
  • LO4: Understand and discuss the tourism-related cultural and social resources (Māori, Pasifika and Post-colonial Cultures) of Aotearoa

    MKTG240 addresses the BCom learning goals in the following manner:
    LO1.1.1 Students can explain and/or apply theory, concepts, models or reasoning from their selected subject major to a problem/issue/context.

    LO4.1.1 Students have engaged with a business, not-for-profit organisation, government department, professional society, professional community or local community and have evaluated their experience.

    L03.1.2    Students can explain the role of tangata whenua in society and in commerce and how te ao Māori (primarily perspectives, values and mana whenua) could be applied in their discipline, field of study or future work place, and the reasons for their incorporation

    LO5.1.2 Students can identify, consider and debate perspectives, processes and impacts relating to the culture and identity of multiple stakeholders, drawing on theory and practice when considering issues in their discipline or field of study.

    The course and its assessments are designed to test learners’ understanding of tourism, hospitality and events as global industries that have impacts on individuals, organizations and communities. The cultural aspects of tourism are explicitly assessed
    • University Graduate Attributes

      This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attributes specified below:

      Critically competent in a core academic discipline of their award

      Students know and can critically evaluate and, where applicable, apply this knowledge to topics/issues within their majoring subject.

      Biculturally competent and confident

      Students will be aware of and understand the nature of biculturalism in Aotearoa New Zealand, and its relevance to their area of study and/or their degree.

      Engaged with the community

      Students will have observed and understood a culture within a community by reflecting on their own performance and experiences within that community.

      Globally aware

      Students will comprehend the influence of global conditions on their discipline and will be competent in engaging with global and multi-cultural contexts.

Pre-requisites

Timetable 2019

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 15:00 - 17:00 A4 Lecture Theatre 18 Feb - 7 Apr
29 Apr - 26 May

Examination and Formal Tests

Test A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 15:00 - 17:00 A4 Lecture Theatre 27 May - 2 Jun

Course Coordinator

Girish Prayag

Lecturer

Girish Prayag

Guest Lecturer

Stefan Gössling (Lund University)

Professor Stefan Gössling

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage  Description
Individual Essay 15 Mar 2019 25% Individual Essay
Applied Group Project 10 May 2019 35% Applied Group Project
Final Test 29 May 2019 40% Final Test


Assessment in this course is designed to measure the extent to which a student is able to recognise and understand the components of the tourism system, link planning and marketing activities to these components, and identify the tourism related cultural resources in Aotearoa, New Zealand. More information about these assessments are available on LEARN.

Weightings and descriptions of the various pieces of assessment are as follows:
Essay 25%  
Due: Friday 15th March by 5PM, on Learn and Printed Copy in Dropbox Level 2, Meremere Building
This essay will assess whether students understand the tourism, hospitality and events industry at global, national and local levels by examining the tourism system and its components at these levels. Students are expected to demonstrate their understanding of the linkages between the components.

Applied Group Project 35%  
Due: Friday 10th May by 5PM, on Learn and Printed Copy in Dropbox Level 2, Meremere Building
The applied group project will involve groups of 4 to 5 students choosing a destination marketing organisation (DMO) or regional tourism organization (RTO) in New Zealand and evaluate the planning, organizing and marketing activities of the chosen organisation. The project will explicitly assess how well the cultural resources of the area/region are used, marketed and managed (Māori and Pasifika).

Final Class Test -TBA 40%
This is the final class test for the course on 29th May – it will be 2 hours long (closed book), and will require students to demonstrate their knowledge of the concepts discussed in class. The final class test covers material found in all assigned chapters during the semester. The venue for the class test will be posted on Learn and announced in class during the term

Grading
The overall pass mark for this course is 50%.

Textbooks

Required Texts

Cooper, Chris,1952- , Hall, Colin Michael; Contemporary tourism :an international approach; Third edition; Goodfellow Publishers, 2016.

Cooper, Chris; CONTEMPORARY TOURISM : AN INTERNATIONAL APPROACH; 4TH ED; GOODFELLOW PUBLISHERS, 2018.

Notes

Class Representative
A class representative may be asked to volunteer in the first few weeks of class. Any problems with the course can be raised with the class rep. Their email can be found at UCSA. The class representative will take up any issues raised by class members with the lecturer concerned as they occur.

Departmental Academic Policies
The Department assumes that you have read this document.

You should also read the General Course and Examination Regulations

Dishonest Practice
The University of Canterbury considers cheating and plagiarism to be serious acts of dishonesty.  All assessed work must be your own individual work unless specifically stated otherwise in the assessment guidelines. Material quoted from any other source must be clearly acknowledged. You must not copy the work of another person (student or published work) in any assessment including examinations, tests and assignments. Any person, who is found to have copied someone else's work, or to have allowed their work to be copied, will receive a fail grade for that piece of assessment and may face disciplinary action which may lead to a fine, community service or exclusion from the university.

IMPORTANT: Where there are concerns regarding the authorship of written course work, a student can be required to provide a formal, oral explanation of the content of their work.

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $806.00

International fee $3,513.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Management, Marketing and Entrepreneurship.

All MKTG240 Occurrences

  • MKTG240-19S1 (C) Semester One 2019