MAOR317-20S2 (C) Semester Two 2020

Takahi: Colonisation

30 points

Details:
Start Date: Monday, 13 July 2020
End Date: Sunday, 8 November 2020
Withdrawal Dates
Last Day to withdraw from this course:
  • Without financial penalty (full fee refund): Friday, 24 July 2020
  • Without academic penalty (including no fee refund): Friday, 25 September 2020

Description

Colonisation has had a significant effect on the shaping of contemporary New Zealand society. This course will cover key events in the colonisation throughout New Zealand’s brief colonial history. This course utilises different theories of colonisation to critically examine the continued subjugation of Indigenous Peoples in Aotearoa and around the world. Special attention will also be paid to breaking down the power relationships that have emerged between coloniser and colonised.

Colonisation has had a significant effect on the shaping of contemporary New Zealand society. This course will cover key events in the colonisation throughout New Zealand’s brief colonial history.
This course utilises different theories of colonisation to critically examine the continued subjugation of Indigenous peoples in Aotearoa and around the world. Key theories include the ‘coloniality of power’ which explores ongoing elements of colonisation still occurring in modern society.  
MAOR317 uses theories like the coloniality of power to examine the process of colonisation in New Zealand, past, presence and future. This paper will provide an in depth explanation on how Te Ao Māori has been impacted by those influences.
This course will help you to develop a range of advanced research and analytical abilities. You will learn how to understand complex social theories and how to apply these concepts in a contemporary setting.
MAOR317 is especially important for people who want to learn about the power relationships that emerge between coloniser and colonised, a theory that can then be related back to the sociocultural landscape in New Zealand.

Was New Zealand settled peacefully? How can we decide? Questions need to be asked
• While viewed as the document that forged the nation, what is the Treaty of Waitangi and what influence does it have on race relations and why?
• What were the policies of assimilation and integration of Māori into a western society, what is the effect and can it still be felt today?
• What roles did religions and governments of the day have in the process of colonisation?
• Although much has been done to challenge negative stereotypes of Māori, how do these begin? Are they all bad? What are the narratives or tools of colonisation?

Some themes running through this course are
• Colonisation globally and locally
• The traits of colonisation; theorists and theories
• The narratives and tools of colonisation
• The Treaty of Waitangi
• Assimilation and integration
• Contemporary issues, where are we now


Course Goals
• Provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of colonisation in New Zealand and throughout the world
• Examine key events in New Zealand’s colonial history and compare internationally
• Identify significant, and continuing, effects of colonisation on indigenous peoples
• Explore the nature of power relationships in colonisation

Learning Outcomes
Students will
• Have a developed understanding of what colonisation is and how it has affected indigenous populations in New Zealand and around the world
• Understand and critique a range of different theory relating to colonialism, post-colonialism and coloneality
• Demonstrate the ability to deliver a presentation of their course research

Why this Paper?
This is a paper about Maori and New Zealand history and therefore pathways are numerable:
• Policy analyst in Māori and Government organisations
• Community development roles especially within Māori and Iwi sectors
• Professional social services, education, and health sector roles that interface with Iwi and Māori organisations.
• Māori and indigenous research
• Law
• Police
• Journalism
• Media

Transferrable Skills
This course contributes to the development of the following transferable skills
• Critical analysis: ability to understand, compare, and contrast.
• Academic research and writing
• Academic annotation
• Presentation of research
• Cultural awareness


BA students who major in Maori and Indigenous Studies must normally take at least two 100-level MAOR courses (two from MAOR107, MAOR108, MAOR170 or MAOR172), plus at least three 200-level MAOR courses, plus at least 60-points from 300-level MAOR courses. For more information see the BA regulations. http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/regulations/award/ba_schedule_a.shtml#unique_32

Pre-requisites

Any 30 points at 200 level from CULT, HIST, MAOR, or
TREO, or
any 60 points at 200 level from the Schedule V of the BA.

Restrictions

RELS322, HIST366, CULT302

Equivalent Courses

CULT302, HIST366, RELS322

Timetable 2020

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Monday 11:00 - 12:00 Rehua 329 13 Jul - 23 Aug
7 Sep - 18 Oct
Lecture B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 10:00 - 11:00 Rehua 329 13 Jul - 23 Aug
7 Sep - 18 Oct
Tutorial A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Thursday 11:00 - 12:00 Rehua 329 20 Jul - 23 Aug
7 Sep - 18 Oct

Course Coordinator

Tessa Barrett-Walker

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage  Description
Annotated Bibliography 20% Annotated Bibliography
Research Essay 30% Research Essay
Presentations 25% Presentations
Research Question and Abstract 25% Research Question - 10% Abstract - 15%

Course links

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $1,553.00

International fee $6,750.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Aotahi School of Maori and Indigenous Studies.

All MAOR317 Occurrences

  • MAOR317-20S2 (C) Semester Two 2020