GEOL476-19X (C) General non-calendar-based 2019

Physical Volcanology

15 points
21 Jan 2019 - 30 Jun 2019

Description

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the physical processes that influence volcanic deposits resulting from both effusive and explosive eruptions. Topics range from the magma reservoir and conduit to the final resting place of volcanic deposits and specifically include the physical properties of magmas, dynamics of lava flows and domes, structure and origin of calderas, explosive eruptions, pyroclastic flows and surges, debris avalanches, lahars, submarine volcanism and magmatic hydrothermal/geothermal systems. There is a compulsory field trip for this course run early in February.

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the physical processes that influence volcanic deposits resulting from both effusive and explosive eruptions. Topics range from the magma reservoir and conduit to the final resting place of volcanic deposits and specifically include the physical properties of magmas, volcano types and scales of volcanism, dynamics of lava flows and domes, structure and origin of calderas, explosive eruptions, pyroclastic flows and surges, debris avalanches, lahars, submarine volcanism and magmatic hydrothermal/geothermal systems.

The course begins with a 9-day field trip (including travel days) from late January to early February (provisional 27Jan-6th) in the Central North Island based on Mt Ruapehu where students will be introduced to field mapping in volcanic settings, making field observations and recording quantitative data, producing maps and cross-sections, and synthesising data into conceptual eruption models and volcano histories. In addition, students will be exposed to the physical volcanological context of geothermal systems. Following the field trip, the course transitions into the first Term of Semester 1 with 6 weeks of lectures. During this time, lectures will focus on building upon concepts in Physical Volcanology that are introduced during the field trip. Lectures and a final project will have a research focus in order to properly prepare students for Honours’ and Master’s theses.

Pre- semester trip and 6 weeks semester 1
2 hour seminars

Learning Outcomes

  • After this course students should be able to….
  •  Describe and illustrate spatial and temporal variation in volcanic deposits and describe volcanic facies.
  •  Interpret volcanological facies to reconstruct volcanic histories
  •  Discuss the benefits and limitations of geological interpretations based on physical volcanology observations and experiments.
  •  Discover the importance of physical volcanology to related fields such as petrology, geochemistry, geothermal exploration, hazard management, geological engineering.
    • University Graduate Attributes

      This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attributes specified below:

      Critically competent in a core academic discipline of their award

      Students know and can critically evaluate and, where applicable, apply this knowledge to topics/issues within their majoring subject.

      Employable, innovative and enterprising

      Students will develop key skills and attributes sought by employers that can be used in a range of applications.

Pre-requisites

Subject to approval of the Head of Department.

Timetable 2019

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Friday 11:00 - 13:00 Ernest Rutherford 260 18 Feb - 31 Mar
Field Trip A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Saturday 09:00 - 17:00 Kaikoura 21 Jan - 27 Jan

Timetable Note

Pre-semester Field Trip  -  Maps, exercises, notebooks due in the field

Term 1  -  Reading  -  Lecture  -  Assignment
Week 9  -  Volatiles chapter 5 Parfitt and Wilson  -  Volatiles and viscosity  -  Before class “Learn” discussion
Week 10  -  Lava Dome and flows Chapters from Encyclopedia Volcanoes; Lava dome
 -  Lava Domes and Flows  -  Before class “Learn” discussion.
Week 11  -  Pyroclastic flow reading   -  Pyroclatic flow case study  -  Before class “Learn” discussion.  Article critique/summary
Week 12  -  TBA  -  TBA  -  Before class “Learn” discussion   Article critique/summary
Week 13  -  TBA  -  TBA  -  Before class “Learn” discussion
Week 14  -  No reading- prepare proposals (Canterbury) and prepare criteria for assessing proposals  -  How to structure and write research reports  -  3 mins presentation on proposed research reports (Canterbury) (not assessed for grades)

Course Coordinator

Ben Kennedy

Lecturer

Darren Gravley

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage  Description
Field trip 40% Field trip: field maps, exercises and notebooks
Class participation: forums and in-class discussions 10% Class participation: forums and in-class discussions
Journal article critiques/summaries 10% Journal article critiques/summaries
Final research project 40% Final research project

Textbooks / Resources

Recommended Reading

Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Encyclopedia of volcanoes; Academic Press, 2000.

Course reading
• Encyclopedia of volcanoes- on-line available through University of Canterbury library
• Assigned journal articles

Course links

Library portal

Notes

Course Aims

After this course students should be able to….
• Describe and illustrate spatial and temporal variation in volcanic deposits and describe volcanic facies.
• Interpret volcanological facies to reconstruct volcanic histories
• Discuss the benefits and limitations of geological interpretations based on physical volcanology observations and experiments.
• Discover the importance of physical volcanology to related fields such as petrology, geochemistry, geothermal exploration, hazard management, geological engineering.

Entry Restrictions
Note: entry into this course is by application only. Please see Ben Kennedy for application form.

Additional Course Outline Information

Academic integrity

Marks and Grades
The Department of Geological Sciences uses the following scale to convert marks into grades:
100 – 90 A+ 75 – 79 B+ 60 – 64 C+
89 – 85 A 70 – 74 B 55 – 59 C
84 – 80 A- 65 – 69 B- 50 – 54 C-
Below 50 D/E
The Department of Geological Sciences reserves the right to adjust this mark/grade conversion, when deemed necessary.

Late Work
Late work should be accompanied with a short note explaining why the work is late. The work will be marked and marks will be subtracted for each day the work is late. Days late include week-ends and holidays.

Aegrotat Applications
If you feel that illness, injury, bereavement or other critical circumstances has prevented you from completing an item of assessment or affected your performance, you should complete an aegrotat application form, available from the Registry or the Student Health and Counselling Service. This should be within seven days of the due date for the required work or the date of the examination. In the case of illness or injury, medical consultation should normally have taken place shortly before or within 24 hours after the due date for the required work, or the date of the test or examination. For further details on aegrotat applications, please refer to the Enrolment Handbook. You have the right to appeal any decision made, including aegrotat decisions.

Missing of Tests
In rare cases a student will not be able to sit a test. In such cases, the student should consult with the course co-ordinator or the Head of Geological Sciences to arrange alternative procedures. This must be done well in advance of the set date for the test, unless the situation is covered by the aegrotat regulations.

Reconsideration of Grades
• Grades for individual items of coursework may be reassessed, and in the first instance students should speak with the course coordinator. If an agreeable solution cannot be reached students should then speak to the Head of the Geological Sciences Department. Reconsideration should normally be requested within 4 weeks of the test or the return of the item of assessment.
• Grade reconsideration for courses as a whole can be obtained by applying to the Registry within 4 weeks of the date of publication of the final results. Students should refer to UC Calendar under general course and examination regulations for details of the appeal process.

Academic Liaison
Tom Brookman and Tim Stahl currently share the Chairperson role on the Postgraduate Liaison Committee. A student representative is appointed to the Liaison Committee at the start of the semester. Please feel free to talk to Tom, Tim or the student representative about any problems or concerns that you might have.

Students with Disabilities
Students with disabilities should speak with someone at the Disability Resource Service. Inquire in the first instance at Level 3 Rutherford Building  Email: disability@canterbury.ac.nz

Policy on Dishonest Practice
Plagiarism, collusion, copying and ghost writing are unacceptable and dishonest practices.
• Plagiarism is the presentation of any material (text, data, figures or drawings, on any medium including computer files) from any other source without clear and adequate acknowledgement of the source.
• Collusion is the presentation of work performed in conjunction with another person or persons, but submitted as if it has been completed only by the named author(s).  
• Copying is the use of material (in any medium, including computer files) produced by another person(s) with or without their knowledge and approval.
• Ghost writing is the use of another person(s) (with or without payment) to prepare all or part of an item submitted for assessment.  
In cases where dishonest practice is involved in tests or other work submitted for credit, the student will be referred to the University Proctor. The instructor may choose to not mark the work.

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $1,033.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Geological Sciences.

All GEOL476 Occurrences

  • GEOL476-19X (C) General non-calendar-based 2019