FORE327-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018

Wood Science

30 points
16 Jul 2018 - 18 Nov 2018

Description

Wood science: chemical composition and ultrastructure of the woody cell wall; biological processes of wood formation; anatomy of wood; physical behavior of wood; the interaction of wood with water; the variability of wood properties; factors influencing wood properties; wood quality based on product requirements; the implication of silviculture on wood properties. Wood processing: saw milling; timber drying; wood preservation; timber grading; wooden panel manufacturing (particle boards, MDF, OSB, plywood); pulp and paper production; energy sector.

Wood is unique in its material properties when compared to competing materials like steel, plastics or concrete. The difference is caused by its highly complex molecular and supra-molecular structure.

The first part of the course focuses on  the chemical, biological and physical phenomena encountered when trying to understand the behavior of wood as a material. Starting on the molecular scale, the chemical composition and ultrastructure of the woody cell wall will be explored followed by the biological processes responsible for the unique anatomy of wood from individual species. The chemical and biological aspects are essential to understanding the physical properties of wood such as strength and stiffness, as well as the interaction of wood with water. Finally, wood quality under the above-mentioned premises is considered and implications for silviculture and forest management are discussed.

The second part looks at the processing of wood, starting with the breakdown of logs in sawmills into solid wood products and involved processes; drying and preservation. These operations are highly complex and vary greatly with the available timber resource. A large portion of the wood resource is broken down into smaller particles of various size and shape and reconstituted into products like wood panels or LVL beams. Another sector using large quantities of wood as raw material is the paper industry. The relevant processes and products are discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages for processing wood in a particular way are explained. A final point are the possibilities of using wood as an energy source and the different technologies for converting the solid fuelwood into liquid or gaseous fuels.

Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  • Know the biological and chemical processes giving rise to the physical properties of wood
  • Understand the advantages and limitations of wood as a material;
  • Understand the key factors influencing wood properties;
  • Be aware of the challenges and opportunities caused by the enormous variability of wood properties;
  • Relate wood properties to the wood quality required by the wood processing industries;
  • Have knowledge about the manufacturing processes and structure of the wood processing industry;
  • Have practical experience in assessing wood properties; and
  • Be able to present scientific and technical topics in seminar and written formats.
    • University Graduate Attributes

      This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attributes specified below:

      Critically competent in a core academic discipline of their award

      Students know and can critically evaluate and, where applicable, apply this knowledge to topics/issues within their majoring subject.

Restrictions

ENFO327, FORE327 prior to 2011

Timetable 2018

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Monday 13:00 - 15:00 Karl Popper 612 16 Jul - 26 Aug
Lecture B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Thursday 12:00 - 14:00 John Britten 117 HP Seminar Room 16 Jul - 26 Aug
Lecture C
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Friday 11:00 - 13:00 Meremere 105 Lecture Theatre 16 Jul - 26 Aug
Lecture D
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Monday 13:00 - 15:00 Jack Erskine 235 10 Sep - 21 Oct
Lecture E
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Friday 11:00 - 13:00 F1 Lectorial 10 Sep - 21 Oct
Lecture F
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Thursday 12:00 - 14:00 Jack Erskine 446 10 Sep - 21 Oct
Field Trip A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 12:00 - 16:00 Lincoln University 17 Sep - 30 Sep
Lab A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 12:00 - 16:00 Forestry 152 23 Jul - 12 Aug
Lab B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 12:00 - 16:00 F3 Lecture Theatre (21/8)
Music 205 (17/7, 14/8)
16 Jul - 22 Jul
13 Aug - 26 Aug
Lab C
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 12:00 - 16:00 Jack Erskine 239 1 Oct - 21 Oct
Workshop A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 12:00 - 16:00 Jack Erskine 239 10 Sep - 16 Sep

Course Coordinator

Clemens Altaner

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage 
Lab Report 1 5%
Report 10%
Mid-Semester Test 25%
Lab Exercise 1 5%
Lab Exercise 2 5%
Lab Exercise 3 5%
Oral Presentation 10%
End-of-Year Exam 35%

Textbooks

Recommended Reading

Walker, J. C. F. , SpringerLink (Online service); Primary wood processing : principles and practice; 2nd ed; Springer, 2006.

Additional Reference materials are available on the course Learn web page

Notes

Stout footwear is essential for industrial visits and work in laboratories.

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $1,874.00

International fee $8,725.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see School of Forestry.

All FORE327 Occurrences

  • FORE327-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018