ENGE414-19T2 (C) Term Two 2019

Applied Hydrogeology

15 points
29 Apr 2019 - 09 Jun 2019

Description

The Applied Hydrogeology course provides postgraduate students in engineering geology and environmental science with a sound understanding of the nature and occurrence of groundwater, various techniques for resource evaluation, contaminant transport issues, and a brief introduction to groundwater modelling. The course is an integrated one, developing both geological aspects of groundwater occurrence and chemistry, as well as pragmatic methods for quantifying flow parameters and aquifer characteristics.

The Applied Hydrogeology course provides postgraduate students in engineering geology and environmental science with a sound understanding of the nature and occurrence of groundwater, various techniques for resource evaluation, contaminant transport issues and an introduction to groundwater modelling. The course is an integrated one, developing both geological aspects of groundwater occurrence and chemistry, as well as pragmatic methods for quantifying flow parameters and aquifer characteristics. Classroom teaching of essential groundwater theory is balanced and supported by laboratory experiments, field activities and computer modelling.

Learning Outcomes

Students successfully completing this course will be able to:

1. Assess hydrogeological controls on groundwater storage and flow.
2. Use a selection of laboratory skills to estimate permeability.
3. Design and interpret aquifer tests in simple aquifer systems.
4. Characterise groundwater flow and quality using standard field techniques.
5. Critically evaluate groundwater recharge volume and timing using the water table fluctuation approach.
6. Use hand calculations and computer modelling to simulate groundwater flow and contaminant transport in simple aquifer systems. This includes simulating surface water-groundwater interaction and groundwater pumping as well as applying basic model calibration concepts.
7. Discuss issues relating to sustainable groundwater management.

Pre-requisites

(1) MATH101 or MATH102 or MATH103 and (2) approval from the Head of Department of Geological Sciences

Restrictions

ENGE 478

Timetable 2019

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Field Trip A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00 Civil - Mech E117 Model Structures Lab 13 May - 19 May
Workshop A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 09:00 - 12:00 Ernest Rutherford 213 Geol Engineering Lab 29 Apr - 5 May
Workshop B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Monday 09:00 - 12:00 Ernest Rutherford 213 Geol Engineering Lab 29 Apr - 2 Jun
Workshop C
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00 Ernest Rutherford 211
211A GIS Comp Lab (7/5, 21/5-28/5)
Ernest Rutherford 213 Geol Engineering Lab (7/5, 21/5-28/5)
6 May - 12 May
20 May - 2 Jun

Course Coordinator

Leanne Morgan

Lecturer

Marlene Villeneuve

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage  Description
Preparatory Assignment 10% Preparatory Assignment
Lab Report 30% Permeability lab report
Field Work Report 30% Field Work Report
Report 30% Computer Modelling Report

Textbooks

Recommended Reading

Domenico, P. A. , Schwartz, F. W; Physical and chemical hydrogeology; 2nd ed; Wiley, 1998.

Fetter, C. W.1942-; Applied hydrogeology; 4th ed; Pearson Education, 2001.

Freeze, R. Allan. , Cherry, John A; Groundwater; Prentice-Hall, 1979.

Heath RC; Basic ground-water hydrology: U.S. Geological Survey Water Supply Paper 2220; (https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/djvu/WSP/wsp_2220.pdf).

Recommended Journal Articles:

Alley WM and Leake SA (2004) The journey from safe yield to sustainability, Groundwater 42(1), 12-16.

Bredehoeft JD (2001) The water budget myth revisited: Why hydrogeologists model, Groundwater 40 (4), 340-345.

Currell M, Gleeson T, Dahlhaus P (2016) A new assessment framework for transience in hydrogeological systems, Groundwater 54(1), 4 – 14.

Fetter CW (2004) Hydrogeology: A short history Part 1, Groundwater 42(5), 790-792.

Fetter CW (2004a) Hydrogeology: A short history Part 2, Groundwater 42(6), 949-953.

Gleeson T, Alley WM, Allen DM, Sophocleous MA and Zhou Y (2012) Towards sustainable groundwater use: Setting long-term goals, backcasting, and managing adaptively, Groundwater (50) 1, 19-26.

Simmons CT (2003) Happy 200th birthday Mr Darcy and our thanks for your law! Hydrogeology Journal 11, 611-614.

Notes

Content:

The following topics and activities are scheduled over 6 weeks in April/May. The first week is set aside for students to review flow through porous media as part of an assessable preparation module.

Class Schedule:
Block #  -  Dates and times  -   Topics

1a - 23 – 27 April  -  Independent study - Review of flow through porous media: online preparation and mastery, Heath pp.2-9, 12-13, 25-31.

1  -  2 May (9 to 12 am)  -  Lecture: Aquifer properties (Occurrence, storage, permeability, hydraulic head) Groundwater in the Canterbury region
      3 May (9 to 12 am)  -  Lecture: Groundwater flow (Darcy’s Law, groundwater flow equations,  flow nets)
      9 May (9 to 12 am)  -  Lecture: Groundwater pumping (Flow to wells, well installation, aquifer test analysis)
      10 May (all day)  -  Lab (Permeability experiments)

2  -  16 May (9 to 12 am)  -  Lecture: Groundwater chemistry and microbiology  -  Field techniques and site evaluation
      17 May (All day)  -  Field work  -  Ilam Fields

3  -  23 May (9 to 12 am)  -  Lecture: Regional groundwater flow  -  Estimating groundwater recharge
      24 May (all day)  -  Lab: Computer modelling
      30 May (9 to 12 am)  -  Groundwater modelling (Purpose, computer codes, model design, calibration and uncertainty, management and regulatory issues)
      31 May  (all day)  -   Lab: Computer modelling

Prerequisites
15 points of 100-level MATH

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $1,033.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

Minimum enrolments

This course will not be offered if fewer than 10 people apply to enrol.

For further information see Geological Sciences.

All ENGE414 Occurrences

  • ENGE414-19T2 (C) Term Two 2019