CULT233-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018

Popular Music in Context

15 points
16 Jul 2018 - 18 Nov 2018

Description

An exploration of contemporary popular music styles from a range of genres, and their historical significance and wider contexts, including music for film and television, and the rise of music video.

The discipline of musicology explores the role of music in history, society, and culture.  At its broads, it includes all genres of music, and includes varied approaches to history, as well as exploring intersection of music and other topics (such as social and political change, revolution, and colonisation).

This course offers an exploration of contemporary popular music styles from a range of genres, and their historical significance and wider contexts, and an appreciation of music in applied and collaborative situations such as music for film and television, and the rise of music video.

Topics covered in this course include:  
• Race and Popular Music in the USA
• The Popular Music Industry: Its history and modes of operation
• Early Rock’n’Roll
• Motown
• The “British Invasion”
• Counterculture(s)
• Psychedelia and Progressive Rock
• Punk and Post-Punk
• Hip Hop
• EDM
• Indie and Alternative Rock
• Globalisation and localisation
• Music videos, fashion and their relationship with popular music
• Popular music production and producers
• The relationship between popular music and recording and music technologies
• The changing sociocultural status of popular musics

Learning Outcomes

Students who pass this course will:

  • Have a knowledge of topics in popular music including historical, historical groupings and schools, biographical, social, philosophical and technical aspects of popular music compositions, styles and the way the music industry grows, produces, distributes and promotes popular music
  • Music research techniques including use of music libraries and on-line databases;
  • Library research skills;
  • Have developed literacy and tertiary study skills

Pre-requisites

MUSA131 or 45 points from the BA Schedule

Restrictions

Equivalent Courses

Timetable 2018

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Monday 12:00 - 13:00 A7 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Lecture B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 09:00 - 10:00 A8 Lecture Theatre 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Tutorial A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 13:00 - 14:00 Fine Arts 122 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct

Timetable Note

WORKLOAD
Student workload (150 hours) will be allocated to:
• 24 hours attending lectures
• 12 hours attending tutorials
• 15 hours writing essay
• 24 hours writing review assignment
• 26 hours interview/research assignment
• 25 hours preparing for listening test
• 24 hours reading/listening around subject

Course Coordinator

James Gardner

Lecturers

Reuben de Lautour and Justin DeHart

Assessment

Assessment Due Date Percentage 
Essay (1500 words) 20%
Review Assignment (1500 words) 25%
Imaginary Interview/Research (2500 words) 25%
Listening Test (45 minutes duration) 30%


All assessments are due by 5 pm on the specified date. Assessment material must be submitted as Word documents, uploaded via LEARN. In the event of online submission via LEARN not working, please contact the Course Co-ordinator for advice and alternative submission methods.
There are four assessment items for this course.

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $834.00

International fee $3,600.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Humanities and Creative Arts.

All CULT233 Occurrences

  • CULT233-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018