Neil Boister

Head of SchoolProfessor Neil Boister

Meremere 316
Internal Phone: 92191

Qualifications & Memberships

Research Interests

My research interests lie in the intersection between the fields of criminal law and international law. My initial specialisation was in International Humanitarian Law and international drug control law. I have recently developed research interests in the International Military Tribunal for the Far East, international tobacco control and the area of transnational crime generally. I amparticularly interested in developing the notion of transnational criminal law, as that part of international criminal law in a general sense which is concerned with the suppression of transantional crime by states.

Recent Publications

  • Boister NB. (2018) An Introduction to Transnational Criminal Law. (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. 450.
  • Boister N. (2012) An Introduction to Transnational Criminal Law. Oxford University Press. xlix+301. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/law/9780199605385.001.0001.
  • Boister N. and Cryer R. (2008) The Tokyo International Military Tribunal: A Reappraisal. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 376. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199278527.001.0001.
  • Boister NB. and Cryer R. (2008) The Tokyo International Military Tribunal: A reappraisal. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
  • Boister NB. and Cryer R. (2008) The Tokyo International Military Tribunal: A reappraisal. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

Neil Boister joined Canterbury as a Senior Lecturer in Law in 2003. He obtained a B.A. degree in English and African Politics from the University of Natal, followed by an LL.B. and a Master of Laws by thesis on the application of humanitarian law to the South African armed conflict.

In 1994, an award of a scholarship enabled Neil to read for a PhD at the University of Nottingham in international drug control law. After having taught criminal and international law at the University of Natal since 1991, he joined the School of Law at the University of Nottingham and taught there from 1998-2002 in criminal law, public law, international law and European criminal law.

Neil's research interests lie in the intersection between the fields of criminal law and international law. He has recently specialised in international drug control law and retains a strong interest in the humanitarian law of armed conflict.