Rosie Ibbotson

Senior LecturerRosie Ibbotson

Honours and Postgraduate Diploma Co-ordinator
Karl Popper 506
Internal Phone: 95368

Qualifications

Research Interests

Rosie Ibbotson's research centres on the long nineteenth century, and concerns the entanglements of visual representation and environmental change. She is writing a book titled 'Picturing the imperial Anthropocene: visual representation, migratory imaginaries, and environmental change in the long nineteenth century', and recently she has published on the intersections of visual and material culture and de-extinction. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Canterbury, Rosie was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Yale Center for British Art, and she completed her doctorate at the University of Cambridge, focusing on the transnational Arts and Crafts Movement.

Recent Publications

  • Ibbotson R. (2018) Ice imagery and the end of the world at the long fin-de-siècle. Visual Cultures of Water, University of Canterbury, 28 Apr 2018.
  • Ibbotson R. (2018) Inside insights of revisionist museologies. Christchurch: invited keynote lecture for Emerging Museum Professionals New Zealand Huakina 2018, 19-20 May 2018.
  • Garrie BAC. and Ibbotson R. (2017) Things Change: Art and Material Culture in Post-quake Ōtautahi Christchurch. Christchurch: Royal Society Te Apārangi 150th Anniversary Lecture: Responding to earthquakes - future perspectives, 02 Aug 2017.
  • Ibbotson R. (2017) "Secured for our museums": Visual cultures of extinction and the imperial Anthropocene. New Haven, Connecticut: invited lecture for Yale University Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Art and Visual Culture Colloquium, New Haven, CT, USA, invited lecture for Yale University Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Art and Visual Culture Colloquium, New Haven, CT, USA, 01 Nov 2017.
  • Ibbotson R. (2017) Representations of ice and climatic fears in Aotearoa New Zealand at the end of the long nineteenth century. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale Center for British Art Research Seminar, 02 Nov 2017.