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Associate ProfessorAdrian McDonald

Associate Professor
Physics 818
Internal Phone: 92064

Qualifications & Memberships

Research Interests

My main research interests are associated with understanding the coupling between different regions of the atmosphere, this coupling often being associated with waves on a number of temporal and spatial scales. My work involves the use of a range of remotely sensed observations from radar and satellite instruments and data from reanalyses and other models.At present I am particularly interested in:- VHF radar remote sensing of convection  and the potential impact of convection on mixing between the stratosphere and troposphere- Stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the Southern Hemisphere- Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere dynamics above Antarctica, primarily related to understanding the wave-driven circulation at these altitudes using the Scott Base MF radar- Internal gravity wave observations with radar and satellite systems- Antarctic ozone depletions dependence on planetary scale waves- The impact of changes in the total solar irradiance on the chemistry and dynamics of the middle atmosphere

Research/Scholarly/Creative Works

  • Coggins J. and McDonald AJ. (2014) Circulation-driven temperature trends at Scott Base and McMurdo Station. Auckland, New Zealand: SCAR Open Science Conference, 25-29 Aug 2015
  • Coggins JHJ., McDonald AJ. and Jolly B. (2014) Synoptic climatology of the Ross Ice Shelf and Ross Sea region of Antarctica: K-means clustering and validation. International Journal of Climatology 34(7): 2330-2348. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/joc.3842.
  • Dennison F., McDonald AJ., Morgenstern O. and Andrew Klekociuk A. (2014) Annular Modes and Stratosphere-Troposphere Coupling in Climate Models. Queenstown, New Zealand: SPARC 2014 General Assembly, 12-17 Jan 2014
  • Fong W., Lu X., Chu X., Fuller-Rowell TJ., Yu Z., Roberts BR., Chen C., Gardner CS. and McDonald AJ. (2014) Winter temperature tides from 30 to 110 km at McMurdo (77.8°s, 166.7°E), Antarctica: Lidar observations and comparisons with WAM. Journal of Geophysical Research 119(6): 2846-2863. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2013JD020784.
  • McDonald AJ. (2014) Deep South - New Zealand National Science Challenge. University of Washington, Seattle, USA.: Clouds, Aerosols, Radiation and Air-Sea Interface of the Southern Ocean: Establishing Directions for Future Research, 18-19 Mar 2014