Alison Downard

ProfessorAlison Downard

Professor
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Rutherford 660
Internal Phone: 94228

Qualifications & Memberships

Research Interests

My research career has been in the areas of electrochemistry and analytical chemistry. Since 2002 I have had a major change in direction, becoming focussed on the manipulation of surface films at the micro- and nanoscale. This new research area is at the interface of chemistry and nanotechnology and is based on electrochemically-assisted modification of substrates giving chemically well-defined surfaces through surface patterning and structuring at the nanoscale. Another new research direction involves interfacing nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes) with biological cells. I am a Principal Investigator with the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology and the recipient of Marsden, MoRST (ISAT) and University of Canterbury funding.

Research/Scholarly/Creative Works

  • Bell KJ., Brooksby PA., Polson MIJ. and Downard AJ. (2014) Evidence for covalent bonding of aryl groups to MnO2 nanorods from diazonium-based grafting. Chemical Communications 50(89): 13687-13690. http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4cc05606j.
  • Downard AJ. (2014) From the bottom up: electrochemistry as a tool for bottom-up construction of nanoscale funtionalised surfaces. Wellington, New Zealand: Conference for Women in Science, 9-11 Jul 2014
  • Downard AJ., Lee L., Brooksby PA., Leroux YR. and Hapiot P. (2014) Designer surfaces: robust monolayers for bottom-up construction of functional interfaces. Adelaide, Australia: Royal Australian Chemical Institute National Congress (RACI), 7-12 Dec 2014
  • Lee L. and Downard AJ. (2014) Preparation of ferrocene-terminated layers by direct reaction with glassy carbon: a comparison of methods. Journal of Solid State Electrochemistry http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10008-014-2615-8.
  • Lee L., Ma H., Brooksby PA., Brown SA., Leroux YR., Hapiot P. and Downard AJ. (2014) Covalently anchored carboxyphenyl monolayer via aryldiazonium ion grafting: A well-defined reactive tether layer for on-surface chemistry. Langmuir 30(24): 7104-7111. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la5013632.