INFO123-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018

Information Systems and Technology

15 points, 0.1250 EFTS
16 Jul 2018 - 18 Nov 2018

Description

Information technology plays an important role in business and society. This course examines how businesses use information systems and technologies to deliver business value and support business strategy, to improve connections with stakeholders, create better business processes, and enhance decision-making. Students develop problem-solving skills applicable to any area in business, and practical skills in Excel and Access to store, organise and use data to address business problems and support decision-making.

Who should take INFO123?  This course is open to all students, and there are no required pre-requisite courses, or NCEA requirements.

INFO123 is part of the core of the Bachelor of Commerce degree as IT is now important to most organisations and most functional areas. Thus the course is relevant to all majors within the BCom degree. The course complements various other courses offered by Accounting, Computer Science, Economics, Finance, Management, and Marketing.

The course explores a variety of IT topics to provide a broad introduction to information systems. The course is a mix of technology and business.  Thus, while some technologies are examined, eg, how the internet works, the course also examines how organisations use the internet and various other technologies.

The course also helps students develop useful transferable skills for workplace and career opportunities. In particular, the course has practical components aimed at developing hands-on skills with Powerpoint, Excel and Access. These are very important tools used in other courses across the University, not just subsequent courses in Information Systems. They are also sought after by many employers. As you build your own knowledge and understanding of the important world of IT, you will also develop your hands-on computer skills and increase your employability.
INFO123 serves as a foundation course for all BCom students. The concepts introduced are relevant to all aspects of managing an organisation including: accounting, human resource management, organisational planning and design, strategic management, operations management, and marketing. The concepts are important at all types of organisation, eg, profit and not-for-profit, as well as all levels within an organisation, from computer user through to the Board of Directors.

Career opportunities
There are many challenging careers in IT, both here in New Zealand and around the world. The ideal person will have a mix of skills and knowledge encompassing IT and business-related areas. Jobs include business analyst, information technology (IT) consultant, project leader, network manager, database administrator, PC support, IS planner, IS manager, IT sales, and webmaster.
For further information about careers in IT, please go to www.canterbury.ac.nz/careers

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, a student should be able to:

1.  Demonstrate an understanding of what are business information systems (IS), the role of IS on business including how IS can be used to deliver business value, support business strategy, and enhance decision-making.
2.  Demonstrate an understanding of key business processes and the systems that support these processes (e.g. Collaboration Systems, ERP, CRM, Business Intelligence) and of the IS development process.
3.  Recognise various aspects, technologies and trends associated with ecommerce and the Internet (e.g. Web 2.0, social networking).
4.  Discuss key issues associated with managing IS in organisations (e.g. outsourcing, IS security, ethical issues).
5.  Describe key concepts, components, technologies and selection criteria associated with the use of IS (e.g. hardware, software, networks and data communication).
6.  Describe and apply key database concepts to organising, managing and using data in a database.
7.  Gain competence with presentation, spread-sheet and database software (i.e. MS PowerPoint, MS Excel, MS Access).
8.  Use good presentation skills to create and deliver a professional presentation to an audience.

University Graduate Attributes

This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attributes specified below:

Critically competent in a core academic discipline of their award

Students know and can critically evaluate and, where applicable, apply this knowledge to topics/issues within their majoring subject.

Restrictions

ACIS123, AFIS123, AFIS124

Timetable 2018

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Friday 14:00 - 15:00 C1 Lecture Theatre 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Lecture B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 16:00 - 17:00 C1 Lecture Theatre 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Computer Lab A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Thursday 15:00 - 16:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
02 Friday 11:00 - 12:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
03 Friday 12:00 - 13:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
04 Thursday 12:00 - 13:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
05 Tuesday 09:00 - 10:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
06 Tuesday 14:00 - 15:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
07 Monday 12:00 - 13:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
08 Tuesday 15:00 - 16:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
09 Monday 11:00 - 12:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Tutorial A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Thursday 15:00 - 16:00 Ernest Rutherford 465 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
02 Wednesday 09:00 - 10:00 Jack Erskine 111 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
03 Thursday 15:00 - 16:00 James Logie 104 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
04 Wednesday 10:00 - 11:00 Jack Erskine 111 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
05 Wednesday 09:00 - 10:00 John Britten 117 HP Seminar Room 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
06 Monday 11:00 - 12:00 Putaiao Koiora 275 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
07 Tuesday 15:00 - 16:00 Jack Erskine 111 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
08 Friday 11:00 - 12:00 John Britten 117 HP Seminar Room 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
09 Wednesday 09:00 - 10:00 Ernest Rutherford 141 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
10 Wednesday 15:00 - 16:00 Jack Erskine 111 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct

Examination and Formal Tests

Test A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 17:00 - 18:00 Jack Erskine 001 Computer Lab 20 Aug - 26 Aug
02 Wednesday 18:00 - 19:00 Jack Erskine 001 Computer Lab 20 Aug - 26 Aug
03 Wednesday 19:00 - 20:00 Jack Erskine 001 Computer Lab 20 Aug - 26 Aug
04 Wednesday 20:00 - 21:00 Jack Erskine 001 Computer Lab 20 Aug - 26 Aug
05 Wednesday 17:00 - 18:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 20 Aug - 26 Aug
06 Wednesday 18:00 - 19:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 20 Aug - 26 Aug
07 Wednesday 19:00 - 20:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 20 Aug - 26 Aug
08 Wednesday 20:00 - 21:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 20 Aug - 26 Aug
Test B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 17:00 - 18:00 Jack Erskine 001 Computer Lab 8 Oct - 14 Oct
02 Wednesday 18:00 - 19:00 Jack Erskine 001 Computer Lab 8 Oct - 14 Oct
03 Wednesday 19:00 - 20:00 Jack Erskine 001 Computer Lab 8 Oct - 14 Oct
04 Wednesday 20:00 - 21:00 Jack Erskine 001 Computer Lab 8 Oct - 14 Oct
05 Wednesday 17:00 - 18:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 8 Oct - 14 Oct
06 Wednesday 18:00 - 19:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 8 Oct - 14 Oct
07 Wednesday 19:00 - 20:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 8 Oct - 14 Oct
08 Wednesday 20:00 - 21:00 Jack Erskine 248 Computer Lab 8 Oct - 14 Oct

Timetable Note

In most weeks, the class will meet for four hours in total, i.e., two hours of ‘lectures’, one hour of computer tutorials, and one hour for a discussion tutorial.  The computer lab tutorials are used to help students develop skills in the following applications:  MS Excel, MS Access, and MS Powerpoint. The discussion tutorials provide an opportunity to address your questions in a small group, to make a presentation using Powerpoint, and to provide feedback on presentations made by other students.

Course Coordinator

Annette Mills

Assessment

To pass INFO123 you have to:
a)  gain a mark for the semester as a whole of 50% or more (but the department reserves the right to move this 50% threshold slightly up or down to ensure fairness).
b)  satisfy the '45% rule' of the ACIS Department. This means that in order to pass the course as a whole you must average not less than 45% over the invigilated components of your assessments. For the semester as a whole you could get more than 50% yet still be awarded a D grade (a fail). In INFO123 the invigilated components include 2 computer lab tests, the mid-semester test and the final exam.

Textbooks

Required Texts

Kroenke, David M, Boyle, Randall J; Using MIS; 9th Global Edition; Prentice Hall.

Course links

Learn

Notes

Contact
The student advisors in the UC Business School can assist you in a variety of ways from planning your degree to helping with special applications regarding your course of study.  http://www.bsec.canterbury.ac.nz/course_advice/

Telephone: +64 3 369 3888
Email:  bsecdegreeadvice@canterbury.ac.nz

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $818.00

International fee $3,788.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Department of Accounting and Information Systems on the department and colleges page.

All INFO123 Occurrences