HSRV103-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018

Violence in Society

15 points, 0.1250 EFTS
16 Jul 2018 - 18 Nov 2018

Description

This course will introduce students to the contemporary issue of violence in society and its impact on the community. A broad overview will be provided of five main areas of violence: child protection; family violence; youth violence; institutional and cultural violence; and, criminal and forensic violence.

The problem of violence has become one of the most critical concerns of our society, affecting people of all ages, across all cultures and social groupings.  This course will introduce students to the contemporary issue of violence in society and its impact on the community. The course provides students with an opportunity to develop theoretical and research informed knowledge and an appreciation of human service responses to this issue. The course will also teach students to analyse the diversity of factors that influence national and international programme development and policies. Course content covers a range of topics: human rights; child protection; family violence; youth violence; violence toward animals; institutional and cultural violence; and, criminal and forensic violence.

Learning Outcomes

To examine the social, economic and political implications of violence on New Zealand society

  • To introduce students to research and literature pertaining to child protection and violence against children, from an international and New Zealand perspective
  • To introduce the area of family violence, including violence in intimate relationships, elder abuse and violence perpetrated by children / young people
  • Consider issues pertaining to youth and violence, including the ways in which violence perpetrated by youth has consequences for victims, families of perpetrators and victims, and the wider community
  • To explore issues relating to institutional and cultural violence, in particular violence that occurs through the actions of an organisation or the people who are its agents
  • To consider institutional and cultural violence as extending beyond direct acts of physical and psychological aggression to incorporate the violation of civil, political and social rights
  • To consider formal and informal social responses to violence
  • To examine a range of intervention paradigms relevant to this issue
    • University Graduate Attributes

      This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attributes specified below:

      Critically competent in a core academic discipline of their award

      Students know and can critically evaluate and, where applicable, apply this knowledge to topics/issues within their majoring subject.

Timetable 2018

Students must attend one activity from each section.

Lecture A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Tuesday 12:00 - 13:00 C1 Lecture Theatre 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Lecture B
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Wednesday 12:00 - 13:00 C1 Lecture Theatre 16 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
Tutorial A
Activity Day Time Location Weeks
01 Thursday 09:00 - 10:00 Jack Erskine 443 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
02 Tuesday 16:00 - 17:00 Jack Erskine 441 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
03 Thursday 15:00 - 16:00 Jack Erskine 244 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
04 Monday 12:00 - 13:00 Jack Erskine 244 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
05 Thursday 16:00 - 17:00 Jack Erskine 111 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
06 Thursday 11:00 - 12:00 Jack Erskine 315 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
07 Monday 16:00 - 17:00 Karl Popper 612 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
08 Thursday 14:00 - 15:00 Jack Erskine 445 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
09 Thursday 15:00 - 16:00 Ernest Rutherford 460 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
10 Tuesday 13:00 - 14:00 Jack Erskine 445 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
11 Thursday 09:00 - 10:00 Jack Erskine 441 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
12 Friday 09:00 - 10:00 Jack Erskine 441 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct
13 Tuesday 16:00 - 17:00 Jack Erskine 445 23 Jul - 26 Aug
10 Sep - 21 Oct

Timetable Note

Within the weekly tutorials, discussion of lecture material is designed to help you explore the concepts being taught in the course as you prepare your written work for assessment. You will be automatically enrolled in a tutorial by the university enrolment system.

Course Coordinator

Maria-Victoria Perez Y Perez

Textbooks

Required Texts

Taylor, Annabel , Connolly, Marie; Understanding violence : context and practice in the human services;

Recommended Reading

McMaster, Ken. , Riley, David., Hall McMaster & Associates; Effective interventions with offenders : lessons learned; Hall McMaster & Associates :Steele Roberts, 2011.

Ray, L; Violence & society; SAGE Publications, 2011 ([electronic resource] http://www.canterbury.eblib.com.au.ezproxy.canterbury.ac.nz/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=689558&echo=1&userid=aRnqYQQE%2bCg%3d&tstamp=1337806210&id=57B88103CE7EE).

Notes

Course material in HSRV103 will be provided in two main contexts: lectures and tutorials. The course is team-taught, so lectures will be given by a number of lecturers. Attendance is not compulsory but is strongly recommended.

Indicative Fees

Domestic fee $746.00

International fee $3,038.00

* Fees include New Zealand GST and do not include any programme level discount or additional course related expenses.

For further information see Language, Social and Political Sciences.

All HSRV103 Occurrences

  • HSRV103-18S2 (C) Semester Two 2018
  • HSRV103-18S2 (D) Semester Two 2018 (Distance)