Future Research

This website seeks to open pathways for future research involving the Canterbury Roll both in New Zealand and overseas. It provides a digital foundation for such research by offering a brief foray into the Canterbury Roll’s historical context alongside high definition photographs of archival quality.

Not seen for over a century by those who have not travelled all the way to Christchurch, New Zealand, there remain many potential avenues for future research based on this fascinating manuscript.

Archival Downloads

The full Roll can be downloaded by clicking on the below links. Warning: These are large files and may take time to load.

The Canterbury Roll - Entire manuscript (photomerged).
Whole Roll: 2350px x 30000px

JPEG files: (10.2MB) or (27MB)
To save: right click, select 'Save Target As'.

For individual sections of of the roll:
Photographic Detail of the Canterbury Roll

Please note: These files are intended primarily for use by researchers. They must not be employed, whole or in part, for any commercial purposes. If in doubt please contact the project director.

E- Resources

Given the technical challenges they pose, few manuscript rolls are presently available online. A Genealogy of the Reign of Edward IV (Chronicle of the History of the World from Creation to Woden, with a Genealogy of Edward IV, Shelfmark Lewis E 201; c. 1461) held by the Free Library of Philadelphia is a rare exception.

Further Reading

Alison Allan, ‘Yorkist Propaganda: Pedigree, Prophecy and the “British History” in the Reign of Edward IV’, in Patronage, Pedigree and Power in Later Medieval England, ed. by Charles D. Ross (Gloucester: A. Sutton, 1979), pp. 171-92.

- ‘Royal Propaganda and the Proclamations of Edward IV’, Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, 59 (1986), 146-54.

Sydney Anglo, ‘The British History in Early Tudor Propaganda’, Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, 44 (1961), 17-48.

Matthew Fisher, ‘Genealogy Rewritten: Inheriting the Legendary in Insular Historiography’, in Broken Lines, Genealogical Literature in Medieval England and France, ed. by Raluca L. Radulescu and Edward Donald Kennedy (Turnhout: Brepols, 2008), pp. 123-41.

Chris Given-Wilson, Chronicles: The Writing of History in Medieval England (Hambledon: Continuum, 2004).

Ralph A. Griffiths, ‘The Sense of Dynasty in the Reign of Henry VI’, in Patronage, Pedigree and Power in Later Medieval England, ed. by Charles D. Ross (Gloucester: A. Sutton, 1979), pp. 13-36.

Rebecca Hayward, ‘Prestige and Pedagogy: The Ownership of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts by New Zealand Universities’, in Migrations: Medieval Manuscripts in New Zealand, ed. by Stephanie Hollis & Alexandra Barratt (Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007), pp. 89-107.

Chris Jones, 'The Canterbury Roll’, in Treasures of the University of Canterbury, ed. by Chris Jones and Bronwyn Matthews with Jennifer Clement (Christchurch: Canterbury University Press, 2011), pp. 85-90.

Olivier de Laborderie, ‘A New Pattern for English History: The First Genealogical Rolls of the Kings of England’, in Broken Lines, Genealogical Literature in Medieval Britain and France, ed. by Raluca L. Radulescu and Edward Donald Kennedy (Turnhout: Brepols, 2008), pp. 45-61.

Robert A. Rouse, ‘Inscribing Lineage: Writing and Rewriting the Maude Roll’, in Migrations: Medieval Manuscripts in New Zealand, ed. by Stephanie Hollis & Alexandra Barrat (Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007), pp. 108-22.

John Spence, ‘Genealogies of Noble Families in Anglo Norman’, in Broken Lines, Genealogical Literature in Medieval Britain and France, ed. by Raluca L. Radulescu and Edward Donald Kennedy (Turnhout: Brepols, 2008), pp. 63-77.

  • Enquiries
    General Editor
    Dr Chris Jones
    chris.jones@canterbury.ac.nz
    Phone +64 3 364 2289
  • Postal Address
    History Department
    School of Humanities
    University of Canterbury
    Private Bag 4800
    Christchurch 8140
    New Zealand